ethics

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ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

[eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ethikos, moral duty
the science or study of moral values or principles, including ideals of autonomy, beneficence, and justice. ethical, adj.

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

the principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the health care professional, patients and colleagues

ethics (eˑ·thiks),

n the standards of conduct that direct a group or indi-vidual. In particular, it relates to the appropriate use of the power held by a group or individual.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics (eth´iks),

n 1. the science of moral obligation; a system of moral principles, quality, or practice.
n 2. the moral obligation to render to the patient the best possible quality of dental service and to maintain an honest relationship with other members of the profession and mankind in general.
ethics, dental,
n See ethics, professional.
ethics, professional,
n the principles and norms of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of health care professionals themselves and their conduct toward patients and fellow practitioners, including the actions taken in the care of patients and family members.

ethics

rules or principles which govern right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession.

code of ethics
the written rules of ethics.
veterinary ethics
the values and guidelines governing decisions in veterinary practice.

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Others, however, would respond by saying that an ethical issue exists aside from duty.
Finally, legal and ethical issues related to both administrative and clinical supervision for school counselors has been explored by Barbara Herlihy, Neal Gray, and Vivian McCollum.
Two recent studies of ethical issues and the ethical conduct of one group of rehabilitation professionals rehabilitation counselors) highlight the importance of training in ethics and ethical decision-making.
As long as the official remains reasonably willing to publicly defend such a decision, the ethical issues justifying this type of deception are the same as those for more traditional forms of law enforcement deception.
day-to-day ethical issues in the care of young parents and their children; "on my own"--a new discourse of dependence and independence from teen mothers; a critical feminist perspective on teen pregnancy and parenthood; teenage pregnancy--social construction?
On one level, the ethical issues involved with pharmacogenomics are similar to those raised by genomics in general--broad concerns about research integrity, privacy, confidentiality, informed consent, the specter of genetic discrimination or stigmatization, and access to information or to specialized care.
This book is a practical manual for dealing with the ethical issues that all professionals confront at the various stages in their development.
These ethical issues go to the heart of biomedical research.
As technology continues to advance and improve and as the ethical issues associated with Web-based supervision are more adequately addressed, it is conceivable that Web-based supervision will become more frequently used in school counselor education programs.
It covers core issues in clinical pediatric ethics; ethical issues at the beginning of life: perinatology and neonatology; when a child dies: ethical issues at the end of life; ethical issues posed by advances in medical technology and science; children, public health, and justice; and special topics.
The second edition of Ethical Issues in The New Reproductive Technologies seeks a cross-section of thinking of the specialists involved in reproductive technologies, providing essays and articles which survey major ethical issues raised by fertilization technology, whether it be paternity questions or surrogate motherhood.
Chapters cover common ethical issues in direct practice and indirect practice, as well as problems in ethical risk management and ethical misconduct.