escape response

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escape response

any flight reaction elicited in an animal as a result of a threat.
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fear as a description of contingencies in which escape behavior is motivated; anger as descriptions of contingencies in which aggressive behavior is motivated) and emotional behavior as behavior that may have originally had an emotional motivational component but subsequently comes under the control of different social contingencies (e.
This logical consequence has proven extremely effective (in fact, more than any other intervention) in reducing escape behavior, as it sets a clear limit and calls for accountability.
The book also takes up the question of how a species with no obvious defensive or escape behavior has survived so well for so long.
Momentum versus extinction effects in the treatment of self-injurious escape behavior.
In contrast, in the saline solution control group, 7 of 9 birds were rated difficult to capture and displayed normal escape behavior.
The extinction of operant classes of escape behavior may best explain the results of Wortman and Breham (1975) who found in some helplessness experiments that participant behavior for escape was facilitated.
Escape behavior has been studied extensively in lizards, effects of predation risk factors and costs of fleeing have been examined more thoroughly in lizards than in any other taxonomic group.
Comparatively greater activity during the first full 24 hours, however, may have been caused by escape behavior, to seek refuge or to get rid of the disturbing stimulus through swimming and flight reactions.
I assume this escape behavior is frequent when the heathland is grazed by cattle.
It was hypothesized that northern long-eared bats in Indiana would demonstrate the same escape behavior as several species of Neotropical bats that flee en masse to new roosts when disturbed (Allen 1939; Bradbury & Vehrencamp 1976); but, instead, northern long-eared bats appear to simply flee to areas of dense cover and then select a roost independent of the decisions made by other roost mates.
As a consequence, this escape behavior presents an excellent platform for the simultaneous study of many aspects of animal biology.