Erythrophleum


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Erythrophleum

a plant genus of the Caesalpiniaceae family from Africa, Asia and Australia; contain diterpenoid alkaloids, e.g. erythrophleine, cause a clinical syndrome of tremor, ataxia, increased intensity of the heart sounds, dyspnea and sudden death. Includes E. africanum, E. chlorostachys (Cooktown ironwood tree, camel poison), E. guineense (sassy bark).
References in periodicals archive ?
It takes its name from the concoction that criminal defendants in Liberia are asked to drink, made from the toxic bark of the Erythrophleum suaveolens tree.
Tambien nos podemos encontrar el caso contrario, como ocurre con la especie africana Erythrophleum ivorense A.
Taking into account herbaceous species, the highest MSR based on abundance-dominance of species were found in Anthocleista schweinfurthii, Erythrophleum ivorense, Garcinia mannii, Harungana madagascariensis.
Investigation of synergistic effects of extracts from Erythrophleum suaveolens, Azadirachta indica, and Chromolaena odorata on the durability of Antiaris toxicaria.
tetrodonta, with a variety of woody species such as Erythrophleum chlorostachys, Xanthostemon paradoxus, and Terminalia ferdinandiana as canopy subdominants, over a sparse understory of perennial and annual grasses such as Sorghum, Chrysopogon, and Ericahne spp.
Several species were more abundant in the VLEM plots than the LEM plots (on R) such as Erythrophleum ivorense (a very large nonectomycorrhizal caesalp legume), Desbordia glaucescens, Protomegabarica macrophylla, Piptadeniastrum africanum, and Strombosia schlefferi and Strombosia glaucescens.
tetrodonta and also includes other eucalypts and the ironwood, Erythrophleum chlorostachyum.
The wood preservative potentials of heartwood extracts of Milicia excela and Erythrophleum suaveolens.
The wood preservative potentials of heartwood extracts of Milicia excelsa and Erythrophleum suaveolens.
The efficacy of heartwood extracts of Afzeila africana and Erythrophleum suaveolens as wood preservative.
These tests identified species compatible with cement without needing any water treatment (Amblygonocarpus andongensis and Brachystegia speciformis) as well as the species becoming compatible after a simple cold- or hot-water extraction of water-soluble components of wood (Pterocarpus angolensis, Kaya nyasica, Erythrophleum suaveoleuns, Albizia adianthifolia, and Sterculia appendiculata).