ergonomics

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Related to Ergonomy: ergonomic, ergonomists

er·go·nom·ics

(er'gō-nom'iks),
A branch of ecology concerned with human factors in the design and operation of machines and the physical environment.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

/er·go·nom·ics/ (er″go-nom´iks) the science relating to humans and their work, including the factors affecting the efficient use of human energy.

ergonomics

[ur′gōnom′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ergon, work, nomos, law
a scientific discipline devoted to the study and analysis of human work, especially as it is affected by individual anatomical, psychological, and other human characteristics. ergonomic, adj.

ergonomics

The formal study of the work environment, which evaluates and, if necessary, reconfigures a workplace by taking into account the anatomic, physiological and psychological variables of those working in the environment.

ergonomics

Occupation medicine The formal study of work situations, which attempts to evaluate, and if necessary, reconfigure a workplace by taking into account the anatomic and psychological variables of those working in the environment. See Ergogenic engineering, Human factor.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

The scientific study of humans in relation to their working environment and the application of science to improve working conditions. The increasing application of complex technology has resulted in increasing human discomfort, difficulties and dangers. Ergonomics seeks to solve such problems.

ergonomics (er·g·nˑ·miks),

n applied study of psychology, anatomy, and physiology relating to people and work environments; includes introduction of biomechanically suppor-tive equipment.

er·go·nom·ics

(ĕr'gŏ-nom'iks)
The science of workplace, tools, and equipment designed to reduce worker discomfort, strain, and fatigue and to prevent work-related injuries.
[ergo- + G. nomos, law]

ergonomics

the science of relating the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the working or racing animal to the physical aspects of its working environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ergonomy and safety, Visoka skola za sigurnost na radu, Zagreb, Iproz, Zagreb
These include the conceiving and review of contents, dealing with issues of ergonomy and user-friendliness that are vital on small-size displays, additional services relative to the mobility of users, integration of the contents within the platform, as well as, if necessary, supplying the actual terminals required for the targeted professional users.
Because of its ergonomy and graphical interface, application developers can't miss Windows '95," explained Jean Philipp Courtois, general manager, Microsoft France.
It is also the first machine in the world certified by the European Institute of Ergonomy, and it is consigned together with the ergonomic handbook, made by Professor Giordano Pierlorenzi.
With excellent levels of precision and ergonomy, the SteelSeries Xai mouse could become your best ally," said Mathieu Girard, Senior Producer at Ubisoft.
Global Factory will become in its third year Digital Farm and will lead agronomy, mechanical, ergonomy, systems and industrial engineering students to rethink agricultural equipment in the context of a farming experience.
As the importance of laboratory ergonomics comes into play, pipette ergonomy is not surprisingly gaining in significance in recent years.
A friendly graphical user interface is always useful for the ergonomy of the application.
The Aurelia, according to the company, is the first espresso coffee machine to be certified by the European Institute of Ergonomy, due to its power panel with a backlit push-button panel to guide the operator choosing the selection they desire, as well as the silicon rubber used to guarantee durability and a good grip.
But all that could change following three years of discussions that British Airways has had with experts in the field of ergonomy and sleep - including former NASA scientists, as well as the airline's own medical experts - to develop ways to counter jetlag.
Among the main requirements of hygiene machinery are modularity, transportability, component standardization, ergonomy, high performance, simplicity, flexibility, modularity, high speeds and process optimization.