equivalence

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e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lens, -len-sē),
1. The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
2. The point in a precipitin test at which antibody and antigen are present in optimal proportions.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]

equivalence

[ikwiv′ələns]
a state of being equal in value.

e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lĕns, -lĕn-sē)
The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]

equivalence

(ē-kwĭv′ă-lĕns) [″ + valere, to be worth]
The quality of being equal in power, potency, force, value, or clinical effectiveness.
References in periodicals archive ?
2013) claimed that their findings confirm the hypothesis that equivalence class formation is enhanced when training guarantees both sample-S+ and sample S- relations and attributed the unexpected results of Condition B to a history of pretraining and training with several two-comparison conditional discriminations.
The expected result was that participants would show equivalence class formation in Condition A and not in Condition B.
This paper, which is based on Nida's equivalence translation theory, discusses the process involved in translation as a mathematical problem.
From Nida's observation, there is evidence that there is rarely total equivalence in word meaning, so the question is: what makes a word have a closer meaning?
Therefore, the literature on methods in these fields as well as the illustrative examples of equivalences in qualitative cross-cultural research focus on personal interviews, a major tool in marketing research.
The next section offers a definition of the construct of equivalence and presents a typology of equivalences frequently used in marketing research.
One of the most widely debated topics in the Stimulus Equivalence literature involves the nature of the relations that form and the involvement or necessity of language (Horne & Lowe, 1996; Sidman, 1994, 2000).
Stimulus equivalence and derived relations more generally have been extensively studied by behavior analytic researchers.
Another finding from equivalence research is a phenomenon called 'transfer of function'.
Most humans who learn matching relations between sets of stimuli typically show equivalence classes, either promptly or in repeated testing (referred to as "delayed emergence;" see Sidman 1994).
Relatively early research in the area of stimulus equivalence tested the prediction that the formation of equivalence classes may be disrupted or retarded by introducing competing sources of stimulus control (e.
Smeets and Barnes-Holmes (2005) explored the probability of responding in accord with equivalence as a function of abstract stimuli and familiar picture stimuli as nodes in two different training structures (OTM and MTO).