Epworth Sleepiness Scale


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Epworth Sleepiness Scale

A scale, obtained by self-administered questionnaire, that rates an individual’s probability of falling asleep on a scale of increasing probability from 0 to 3 for eight different situations that people experience in their daily lives. A final score of 0–9 is in the normal range; 11–15 is typical of mild to moderate sleep apnoea; a score of 16 and above is associated with severe sleep apnoea and narcolepsy (for the latter of which the Epworth Sleepiness Scale is both highly specific and sensitive). Named after the Epworth Hospital in Melbourne.

Epworth Sleepiness Scale

Sleep disorders A testing instrument used to indicated a person's risk of dozing in specific situations, as well as daytime sleepiness. See Sleep disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effectiveness of combination of prazosin and sleep hygiene training for reduction of headache (HA) pain, HA frequency, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score.
2 SO2 < 90 ESS, Epworth sleepiness scale (maximum score=24); AHI, apnoea-hypopnoea index measured by polysomnography * Up to 10 yr of education; ([dagger]) more than 10 yr of education; ([double dagger]) number of arousals identified by EEG averaged per hour, assessed during PSG Numbers in parentheses are percentages Table III.
8,17) In our study, the Epworth sleepiness scale results in the patient group were not different from the control group.
Answers to the questions are rated on a reliable scale called the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS).
The trial results demonstrated dose-related improvement in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, statistically significant at the 6 and 9 gram daily doses.
The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) is a self-administered, 8-item questionnaire that measures the general level of daytime sleepiness in adults (Johns, 1991, 1992).
The Epworth Sleepiness Scale was used to survey 638 patients with the disease; 51% reported excessive daytime sleepiness, and 4% of the patients who drove reported at least one episode of a sleep attack since their diagnosis.
Here's a test - called the Epworth Sleepiness Scale - that sleep specialists use to determine whether you're getting enough sleep.
A random sample of 857 men without previously diagnosed OSA underwent at-home polysomnography and completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale questionnaire, and 1,660 men without depression at baseline were included in the analysis of incident depression.
The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT); and secondary endpoints included Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Clinical Global Impression-Change (CGI-C).
CPAP also improved scores on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, a self-administered questionnaire in which patients rate their likelihood of dozing off during various situations.
The validated screening questionnaires utilized in the study included a four-item Brief Restless Legs Scale, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the General Sleep Disturbance Scale.