Epworth Sleepiness Scale


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Epworth Sleepiness Scale

A scale, obtained by self-administered questionnaire, that rates an individual’s probability of falling asleep on a scale of increasing probability from 0 to 3 for eight different situations that people experience in their daily lives. A final score of 0–9 is in the normal range; 11–15 is typical of mild to moderate sleep apnoea; a score of 16 and above is associated with severe sleep apnoea and narcolepsy (for the latter of which the Epworth Sleepiness Scale is both highly specific and sensitive). Named after the Epworth Hospital in Melbourne.

Epworth Sleepiness Scale

Sleep disorders A testing instrument used to indicated a person's risk of dozing in specific situations, as well as daytime sleepiness. See Sleep disorder.
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A new method for measure daytime sleepiness the Epworth Sleepiness Scale.
The Epworth Sleepiness Scale is an instrument developed to assess the level of daytime sleepiness and can be useful in the diagnosis of sleep disturbances.
Excessive daytime sleepiness assessed by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and its association with health related quality of life: a population-based study in China.
Reliability and validity studies of the Turkish version of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale.
The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), developed by Murray Johns in 1991, is a self-administered questionnaire that evaluates sleep tendencies.
0066), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores decreased in the two groups by 5.
The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was designed in 1991 as a simple, cost-effective method to determine daytime sleepiness by asking individuals how likely they would be to fall asleep if they encountered eight different situations (Johns, 1991).
The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), a quick 8-item screening questionnaire, determines the average person's level of sleepiness during the day.
The pre-test participants were also administered the MMSE-P (14) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale to assess for convergent and divergent validity, respectively.
How is the Epworth Sleepiness Scale related with subjective sleep quality and polysomnographic features in patients with sleep-disordered breathing?