eponym

(redirected from Eponyms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

eponym

 [ep´o-nim]
a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, such as Hodgkin's disease, Cowper's glands, or Schick test. adj., adj eponym´ic, epon´ymous.

ep·o·nym

(ep'ō-nim),
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who discovered or described it first.
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

[ep′ənim]
Etymology: Gk, epi, above, onyma, name
a name for a disease, organ, procedure, or body function that is derived from the name of a person, usually a physician or scientist who first identified the condition or devised the object bearing the name. Examples include fallopian tube, Parkinson's disease, and Billing's method.

eponym

Medtalk A syndrome, lesion, surgical procedure or clinical sign that bears the name of the author who first described the entity, or less commonly, the name of the index Pt(s) in whom the lesion was first described

ep·o·nym

(ep'ŏ-nim)
The name of a disease, structure, operation, or procedure, usually derived from the name of the person who first discovered or described it.
Synonym(s): eponymic (2) .
[G. epōnymos, named after]

eponym

A name of a disease, syndrome, anatomical part, surgical instrument, etc derived from the name of the person who discovered, invented or first successfully promulgated it.

eponym

a name or phrase formed from or including a person's name, e.g. Theiler's disease, Cowper's gland, Aschheim-Zondek test.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, although tobit is of course a play on probit and logit, two related (and noneponymous) concepts, it might also be a case of still another type of eponymy, rare in economics but common in other fields and in everyday language: fictional eponyms (as in "Oedipus complex," "Pandora's box," and so forth).
Genetic clues have led to a methodical classification of four distinct forms of EB, clarifying 30 subtypes historically identified by uninformative eponyms related to whichever physician first described them, Dr.
The eponyms of Scott Spencer's 1995 novel Men in Black are intergalactic disinformation specialists who pay ominous unannounced visits to those who have spotted extraterrestrials.
All the capabilities are there making IMO's search the best of breed: partial words, eponyms, synonyms, acronyms and we even account for many types of misspellings.
It includes dissection of the white rat and selected mammalian organs, physiological experiments, emphasis on the study of anatomy through histology, terms accompanying drawings and photos to be labeled, phonetic pronunciations and derivations for terms, diagrams of common lab equipment, lab report questions and reports at the end of each exercise, emphasis on safety, and three appendices on units of measurement, the periodic table, and eponyms.
Spectorsky draws on works by (or attributed to) the eponyms of the Sunni legal schools and their direct disciples, including Muhammad al-Shaybani's polemical Kitab al-Hujja, al-Shafi'i's Umm, Malik's Muwatta' in both its most common recension and that of al-Shaybani, and 1bn Hanbal's Masa'il.
The Wenckebach phenomenon, or Mobitz type 1 AV block, is one of the most common eponyms used in medicine.
For starters, I investigated how much mischief can be wrought by inserting "the" into the midst of known names, eponyms or pseudo-eponyms.
The Epocrates(R) Medical Dictionary allows healthcare professionals to quickly access medical terms and eponyms on their mobile devices.
What about eponyms, words derived from people's names?
The eponyms of "The Curfew Breakers" are those who pay the price of protest: "to wake up in the morning / as an object of dispute / and die in the evening / as a curfew breaker / is also for the love of life.
In practice, clinicians use many different synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, abbreviations and other terms to describe the same diseases and problems.