Epley maneuver

canalith repositioning maneuver

a maneuver to reposition otolithic debris from the semicircular ducts, usually the posterior, to the utricle in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
Synonym(s): Epley maneuver

Epley maneuver

A technique used to manage benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which involves sequential movement of the head into 4 positions.

Epley maneuver

Canalith repositioning procedure, modified liberatory maneuver Neurology A technique used to manage BPPV, which involves sequential movement of the head into 4 positions. See Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
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They included fine-needle aspiration, incision and drainage of abscesses and cysts, removal of cysts, wick placement, laceration repair, treatment of soft-tissue injuries, biopsies and repair, excisional and brush biopsies, release of lingual frenulum, treatment of mucoceles, endoscopy, flexible laryngoscopy, videostroboscopy, drug therapy, uvulectomy, treatment of dysphagia and reflux, foreign body removal, myringoplasty, micro-otoscopy and photo documentation, mastoid cleansing, postoperative care, intertympanic steroid injection, Epley maneuver, polypectomy, epistaxis control, repair of deviated nasal septum, coblation under local anesthesia, closed reduction of nasal fractures, and many more.
The Epley maneuver, also called the canalith repositioning procedure, guides the patient's head through a five-position cycle of gentle, specific movements.
For more information on the Epley maneuver, physicians and patients may call the Mayo Clinic at 507-284-2511.
Food and Drug Administration has cleared DizzyFIX, an at-home treatment for vertigo and dizziness which helps guide patients through the Epley maneuver, for sale in the U.
com or see our site for background information on DizzyFIX and more information about the Epley Maneuver.
1) However, the fact that not all patients respond to the Epley maneuver (2) suggests that a different etiology is involved, and this led to the theory of cupulolithiasis, which holds that dislodged otoconia irritate the cupula.
John Epley, developer of the Epley maneuver, the software-driven system uses infrared video goggles to assist in the analysis of abnormal eye movement patterns associated with the shifting of loose particles (calcium stones, or crystals) in the inner ear canals and pinpoint their location.
A falling sensation after an Epley maneuver is indeed an interesting clinical sign that has not been sufficiently discussed in the literature, and its clinical significance has not been thoroughly evaluated.
Like the author, we hold the patient firmly after every Epley maneuver we perform for about 30 seconds, supporting the patient's body from the back.
The author recommends that physicians who perform the Epley maneuver warn patients of the risk of a falling sensation, take steps to prevent its consequences, and monitor their patients for at least 30 minutes after the completion of the procedure.
We assessed the efficacy of the Epley maneuver (canalith repositioning) in a study of 81 patients with posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).
A modified Epley maneuver was performed for all patients with posterior semicircular canal BPPV, with a 98% success rate.