epigenetics

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epigenetics

(ĕp′ĭ-jə-nĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of heritable changes in gene expression that are caused by factors such as DNA methylation rather than by a change in the sequence of base pairs in DNA itself.

epigenetics

(ĕp″ĭ-jĕ-nĕt′ĭks)
Changes in the way genes are expressed that occur without changes in the sequence of nucleic acids. In mammals the most common form of epigenetic change results from methylation (the addition of methyl [-CH3] moieties) to the promoter regions of genes. Although epigenetic changes do not alter the sequence of nucleotides, they are inheritable.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Inheritance of a cancer-associated MLH1 germ-line epimutation.
13) In many cases wherein epimutations are associated with disease, direct causality has not yet been determined.
Other known associations between epimutations and disease include obesity, allergy, cardiovascular, and problems with aging.
Prescription drugs, pesticides, and fertilizer have all been linked to epimutations.
In addition, DDT is associated with epimutations associated with several diseases.
Another environmental stressor leading to epimutations is maternal dietary deficiencies in vitamins or other nutrients.
39) Epimutations related to aberrant DNA methylation patterns have been tracked to the F5 generation, or the fifth generation after direct exposure.
cfsRNA in high concentrations is more readily isolated than spermatozoal RNA and is likely a better candidate to screen for heritable germline epimutations, especially in cases of insufficient sperm production.
1), most cfsRNA fragments containing epimutations might be identified from the semen of patients with genetic disorders.
We won't know how important these epimutations are until we measure the effect on plant traits, and we're just now to the point where we can do these experiments.
Heritable defects in gene expression not involving DNA sequence changes have been referred to as epimutations (16).