environment

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environment

 [en-vi´ron-ment]
the aggregate of surrounding conditions or influences on an individual.

en·vi·ron·ment

(en-vī'rŏn-ment),
The milieu; the aggregate of all of the external conditions and influences affecting the life and development of an organism. It can be divided into physical, biologic, social, cultural; any or all of which can influence the health status of the population.
[Fr. environ, around]

environment

/en·vi·ron·ment/ (en-vi´ron-ment) the sum total of all the conditions and elements that make up the surroundings and influence the development of an individual.environmen´tal

environment

(ĕn-vī′rən-mənt, -vī′ərn-)
n.
a. The totality of the natural world, often excluding humans: "Technology, of course, lies at the heart of man's relationship with the environment" (Mark Hertsgaard).
b. A subset of the natural world; an ecosystem: the coastal environment.
c. The combination of external physical conditions that affect and influence the growth, development, behavior, and survival of organisms: "Conditions in a lion's environment ... can drive it to hunt people" (Philip Caputo).
d. The complex of social and cultural conditions affecting the nature of an individual person or community.

environment

Etymology: Gk, en, in; L, viron, circle
all of the many factors, both physical and psychological, that influence or affect the life and survival of a person. See also biome, climate. environmental, adj.

en·vi·ron·ment

(en-vī'rŏn-mĕnt)
The milieu; the aggregate of all of the external conditions and influences affecting the life and development of an organism.
[Fr. environ, around]

environment

the surroundings of any organism, including the MEDIUM, SUBSTRATE, climatic conditions, other organisms (see BIOTIC FACTORS), light and pH.

en·vi·ron·ment

(en-vī'rŏn-mĕnt)
The milieu; aggregate of all external conditions and influences affecting life and development of an organism.
[Fr. environ, around]

environment (envī´rənment, en-vī´urnment),

n the aggregate of all the external conditions and influences affecting the life and development of an organism.
environment, extracellular,
n the external, or interstitial, environment provided and maintained for the tissue cells.
environment, oral,
n all oral conditions present and their influences.

environment

the sum total of all the conditions and elements that make up the surroundings and influence the development of an animal. The environment of animals is often assumed to comprise only physical, chemical and biological factors but society is gradually coming to appreciate that there is also an emotional and psychological side to the life of all animals.

Patient discussion about environment

Q. what environment is recommended for one who has Asthma?

A. dry and clean. as less pollens, dust, pollution - the better is for the asthmatic. any allergen in the environment would cause attacks. (as long as he is allergic..)

Q. i feel huge tension when i am in close narrow environment , is it a phobia?

A. Yes, it may be considered a phobia, or more specifically situational type phobia. However, the important thing is whether is this fear reasonable? Do you think it's out of proportion? Phobia is a fear that one perceive as irrational and out of proportion and yet one feels and is affected adversely by it. If this fear is appropriate (e.g. fear of falling in mountain climbing) it's not a phobia.

You may read more about it http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/phobias.html

Q. how exactly dust effects on asthmatic people? how can one avoid a dust environment?

A. some people try to dust proof there home,they change there matress once a year-----thay do not have rugs in there home---no curtains or draps --and they have someone else dust and clean/no pets.some people keep there pets and take allergie meds.

More discussions about environment
References in periodicals archive ?
The 'concepts' will be identified through the use of frameworks put forward by Silvernail (1992a) regardingbeliefs about education, and Willower, Eidell, and Hoy (1967) regarding learning environments.
We likely will not relinquish much of the good life that we have worked so hard to achieve and return to the environments of our ancestors.
As an example, we can't help but see the marketing of in-band storage virtualization solutions to small environments (as small as 2TB) as failing this test.
Neighborhood Environments and the Well-Being of Older Tenants in Planned Housing.
Work Environments and the Experience of Stress by People with Disabilities
Homelike" healthcare environments erode confidence in the professionalism of what is essentially a healthcare facility.
Although this article focuses on planning for a postretirement career, whether the retirement plan includes traditional jobs or work assignments in volunteer environments depends on the needs and values of the individual and the suitable career environments that are available.
We provide a development environment that is a front end to a variety of simulation modes with an application programming interface that further abstracts the models, making them all look the same to the software.
The findings of the studies suggest that student outcomes can be improved by creating classroom environments which are conducive to learning.
As Cohen and his colleagues have demonstrated, there are in fact physical, structural designs that create environments reminiscent of home.
Wired Environments announced today that the firm now offers the nation's most affordable, convenient and reliable dial-up access-a cost-effective alternative to "always-on" Internet service.
THE AUTHOR SUGGESTS THAT CURRENT CONDITIONS ARE nearly ideal for the effective meta-assessment of online reference services (ORS), in part because expected patterns and modes of service have not yet been established for emerging and evolving online environments, and in part because the distance between theory and practice regarding reference service in general is at its perigee.

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