statistics

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statistics

 [stah-tis´tiks]
1. a collection of numerical data.
2. the mathematical science dealing with the collection, analysis, and interpretation of numerical data using the theory of probability, especially with methods for drawing inferences about characteristics of a population from examination of a random sample.
vital statistics data, usually collected by governmental bodies, detailing the rates of birth, death, disease, marriage, and divorce in a population.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks),
1. A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts that are numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly analysis of the probability that the resulting empiric findings are due to chance.
2. The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation.

statistics

/sta·tis·tics/ (stah-tis´tiks)
1. a collection of numerical data.
2. a discipline devoted to the collection, analysis, and interpretation of numerical data using the theory of probability.

vital statistics  data detailing the rates of birth, death, disease, marriage, and divorce in a population.

statistics

[stətis′tiks]
a mathematic science concerned with measuring, classifying, and analyzing objective information.

statistics

Statistics
1. A collection of datapoints or numerical values that can be categorized and subject to analysis; statistics are the raw material on which conclusions about cause-and-effect relationships are based.
2. The field that formally studies cause-and-effect relationships; the systematic collection, classification, and mathematical compilation of data vis-á-vis amount, range, frequency, or prevalence; those methods for planning experiments, obtaining data, and organizing, summarizing, presenting, analyzing, interpreting, and drawing conclusions. See Actuarial statistics, Coefficient of variation, Cusum statistics, Descriptive statistics, Health statistics, Mean, Standard deviation, t test.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks)
1. A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts that are numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly analysis of the probability that the resulting empiric findings are due to chance.
2. The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation.

statistics

See VITAL STATISTICS.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks)
A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly of the probability that resulting empiric findings are due to chance.

statistics,

n the branch of mathematics that gathers, arranges, condenses, coordinates, and mathematically manipulates obtained facts so that the numerical relationships between those facts may be seen clearly and freed from anomalies resulting from chance factors.
statistics, descriptive,
n.pl the statistics used to describe only the observed group or sample from which they were derived; summary statistics such as percent, averages, and measures of variability that are computed on a particular group of individuals.
statistics, inference,
n.pl the inferences made regarding characteristics or general principles about an unseen population based on the characteristics of the observed sample. Statistical findings from a sample are generalized to pertain to the entire population. The process of drawing inferences, making predictions, and testing significance are examples of inferential statistics.
statistics, nonparametric,
n.pl the sta-tistical methods used when the statistician cannot assume that the variable being studied is normally distributed in a population. Also called
distribution-free statistics.

statistics

1. numerical facts pertaining to a particular subject or body of objects.
2. the science dealing with the collection, tabulation and analysis of numerical facts.

inferential statistics
conclusions, usually quantitative, drawn from an analysis of data.
salvage statistics
statistical technique used in an attempt to derive some useful information from a poorly designed or poorly executed experiment.
vital statistics
see vital statistics.

Patient discussion about statistics

Q. What are the known statistics of Autism: Here is a question which needs a very detailed reply please. What are the known statistics of Autism: incidence, cost and ratio?

A. for more statistical information here are 2 sites:
http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_whatis_factsstats

and here is the CDC site link:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dd/addmprevalence.htm

Q. Do you know if Propecia can truly stop hair loss and even grow back hair. do you have any statistics about it? do you know if there are any side effects to this medication?

A. it does work but there is some side affects, as in E.D. while you are on the med.

Q. What is the statistic number of women having breast cancer or under the threat of having breast cancer? where would i find a good , and reliable info about the disease ?

A. it is said that today 1 out of any 8 women will have breast cancer. there are also men who has breast cancer but the numbers are considerably lower.
about a good source of info- the site that doctoradhi gave you is pretty good, and you can use also the national medical library link:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/breastcancer.html#cat22

good luck!

More discussions about statistics
References in periodicals archive ?
He said that the interest in environmental statistics in Qatar comes in line with Qatar National Vision 2030 and with the national strategy for the development of statistical work, which include an integrated programme for the development of the various kinds of statistics.
Although environmental statistics will probably never hit people's pocketbooks as directly as did the CPI, they can get caught in the crossfire between business and environmental groups.
Practical environmental statistics and data analysis.
Available environmental statistics and community information support the call for more thorough testing.
of California, Berkeley, and Silvers, a consultant in environmental statistics and the design, database management, and analysis of health studies and clinical trials, has taught statistics at Baylor College of Medicine.
During his career, he has been actively involved in applications of statistics to public policy; national statistics and the federal statistical system, statistical evidence in the courts, environmental statistics, and statistical theory.
Statistical Methods for Groundwater Monitoring, Second Edition is an excellent supplement to courses on environmental statistics at the upper-undergraduate and graduate levels.
During her career, she has participated in many fields of major statistical activities, including statistical ecology, environmental statistics, statistical education, and sampling methods for natural systems.
Highly accurate forecasting and what-if scenario-building capabilities based on historical activity data, unique service objectives and specific environmental statistics.
At the Joint Statistical Meetings (JSM), August 13-17, 2000, statisticians from government, industry, and academia will present research and discuss recent findings on environmental statistics.
Important uses of the software include manufacturing quality control, design of experiments for research and development, and monitoring of social and environmental statistics.
At the Joint Statistical, Meetings (JSM), August 13-17, 2000, statisticians from government, industry, and academia will present research and discuss recent findings on environmental statistics.

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