enterotoxin

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Related to Enterotoxins: endotoxin, Exotoxins

enterotoxin

 [en´ter-o-tok″sin]
a toxin specifically affecting cells of the intestinal mucosa, causing vomiting and diarrhea, such as those elaborated by species of Bacillus, Clostridium, Escherichia, Staphylococcus, and Vibrio.

en·ter·o·tox·in

(en'tĕr-ō-tok'sin),
A cytotoxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.

enterotoxin

/en·tero·tox·in/ (en´ter-o-tok″sin)
1. a toxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.
2. a toxin arising in the intestine.
3. an exotoxin that is protein in nature and relatively heat-stable, produced by staphylococci.

enterotoxin

(ĕn′tə-rō-tŏk′sĭn)
n.
Any of various bacterially produced toxins that specifically affect intestinal cells and cause vomiting and diarrhea, as in staphylococcal food poisoning and cholera.

enterotoxin

[-tok′sin]
a toxic substance that causes an adverse reaction by cells of the intestinal mucosa. Most enterotoxins are produced by certain species of bacteria, such as Staphylococcus.

enterotoxin

Infectious disease A toxin with a direct effect on the intestinal mucosa, eliciting net fluid secretion; the 'classic' enterotoxin is cholera toxin, which evokes intestinal fluid secretion, by activating adenylate cyclase. See Endotoxin, Exotoxin.

en·ter·o·tox·in

(en'tĕr-ō-tok'sin)
A cytotoxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.

enterotoxin

Any bacterial toxin that damages intestinal tissue and causes diarrhoea and vomiting, the signs of food poisoning.

Enterotoxin

A type of harmful protein released by bacteria and other disease agents that affects the tissues lining the intestines.
Mentioned in: Dysentery

enterotoxin

1. a toxin specific for the cells of the intestinal mucosa.
2. a toxin arising in the intestine.
References in periodicals archive ?
aureus enterotoxins occurs relatively acutely (lasting 24-48 hours), people often do not to seek medical care and when they do the lack of laboratory confirmation complicates the ability to know the true incidence of cases (FDA, 2011a; Mead et al.
coli strains secreted a novel heat-stable enterotoxin and/or a heat-labile enterotoxin resembling cholera toxin, which accounted for their virulence.
cephalosporins such as cefepime or quinolones, which eradicate susceptible gram-positive, gram-negative, and anaerobic flora) Community-acquired No specific antibiotic usage pattern has been (CA) associated with CA- MRSA (with the possible exception of amoxicillin use in children) (8) Type of MRSA Resistance genes Hospital-acquired Contains distinct SCCmec types, plasmids (HA) encoding resistance to various antibiotics, as well as heavy metal resistance elements Community-acquired Contains SCCmec type IV (CA) Type of MRSA Toxins Hospital-acquired Characteristically lacks the toxin genes (HA) Community-acquired May possess staphylococcal enterotoxins B and C, (CA) toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin Table 3.
aureus colonization and identification of enterotoxins A, B, C, or D.
Human colonic epithelial cells, HT29/C1, treated with crude Bacteriodes fragilis enterotoxin dramatically alter their morphology.
Preliminary tests of live, attenuated Shigella flexneri vaccine candidates have resulted in the discovery of two new enterotoxins.
The researchers showed that guanylin, like the heat-stable enterotoxins, causes the intestinal cells to release water and salt into the gut.
On investigation of the samples, high concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus and enterotoxin were detected.
To combat this problem, an automated and rapid method for detecting staphylococcal enterotoxins is needed by regulatory agencies and food companies.
Purification of El Tor cholera enterotoxins and comparisons with classical toxin.
Serum antibody response to Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins and TSST-1 in patients with septicaemia.
Involvement of enterotoxins G and I in staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome and staphylococcal scarlet fever.