Enterobacteriaceae


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Enterobacteriaceae

 [en″ter-o-bak-tēr″e-a´se-e]
a family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, usually motile, made up of saprophytes and plant and animal parasites of worldwide distribution, found in soil, water, and plants and in animals from insects to humans. In humans, disease is produced by both invasive action and production of toxin. Species not normally associated with disease are often opportunistic pathogens. Enterobacteriaceae have been responsible for as many as half of the nosocomial infections reported annually in the United States, most frequently by species of Escherichia, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus, Providencia, and Serratia.

En·ter·o·bac·te·ri·a·ce·ae

(en'tĕr-ō-bak-ter'ē-ā'sē-ē),
A family of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonsporeforming bacteria (order Eubacteriales) containing gram-negative rods. Some species are nonmotile, and nonmotile variants of motile species occur; the motile cells are peritrichous. These organisms grow well on artificial media. They reduce nitrates to nitrites and use glucose fermentatively with the production of acid or acid and gas. Indophenol oxidase is not produced by these organisms. They do not liquefy alginate, and pectate is liquefied only by members of one genus, Pectobacterium. This family includes many animal parasites and some plant parasites causing blights, galls, and soft rots. Some of these organisms occur as saprophytes that decompose carbohydrate-containing plant materials. The type genus is Escherichia.

Enterobacteriaceae

/En·tero·bac·te·ri·a·ceae/ (en″ter-o-bak-tēr″e-a´se-e) a family of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria (order Eubacteriales) occurring as plant or animal parasites or as saprophytes.

Enterobacteriaceae

[en′tirōbaktir′ē·ā′si·ē]
Etymology: Gk, enteron + bakterion, small staff
a family of aerobic and anaerobic gram-negative bacteria that includes both normal and pathogenic enteric microorganisms. Among the significant genera of the family are Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, and Salmonella.

Enterobacteriaceae

Microbiology A family of gram-negative, rod-shaped facultative anaerobic bacteria, most of which are motile–peritrichous flagella, oxidase-negative and have relatively simple growth requirements; Enterobacteriaceae are primarily saprobes, are widely distributed in nature in plants and animals, and are important pathogens; they are part of the intestinal flora, and popularly termed gram-negative rods–GNRs; they cause ±12 of all nosocomial infections in the US, most commonly by Escherichia, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Proteus, Providentia, and Salmonella spp; less pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae include Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Erwinia, Hafnia, Serratia, Shigella, Yersinia spp. See Citrobacter, Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Escherichia, Hafnia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Providentia, Salmonella, Serratia, Shigella, Yersinia.

Enterobacteriaceae

(en´tərōbak´tir´ēā´sēē´),
n.pr a family of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria that includes both normal and pathogenic enteric microorganisms such as
Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, and
Salmonella.

Enterobacteriaceae

a family of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria (order Eubacteriales) occurring as plant or animal parasites or as saprophytes. Includes the lactose-fermenting genera of Escherichia, Enterobacter, Serratia and Klebsiella, and the apathogenic genera, Citrobacter and Erwinia. Also includes the nonlactose fermenters with pathogenic significance, Salmonella, Proteus and Yersinia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Resistance to the clinically significant carbapenem antibiotics by enzymatic hydrolysis has been described in Enterobacteriaceae worldwide, and recently the class D [beta]-lactamase, OXA-48 and its variants have been detected more frequently.
Available data on colonization with MDR Enterobacteriaceae in pediatric patients suggest that intestinal carriage of these organisms can last for months to years in some children and that this might be associated with reinfection or potential spread to other family members (37,38).
Although mecillinam has performed well in in-vitro studies against ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, authors have warned against its use as mono therapy due to the apparent effect of high bacterial inoculum, and hence high concentrations of [beta]-lactamase production, which increases the MIC level of mecillinam (32,33).
Detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases among Enterobacteriaceae by use of semiautomated microbiology systems and manual detection procedures.
Though CLSI described phenotypic confirmatory test is applicable for Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis, an attempt was made to look for ESBL production among other members of Enterobacteriaceae also.
Of importance is the drug's activity against ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter, MRSA, and enterococci.
Repeated testing of eggs after washing and packaging showed no Enterobacteriaceae bacteria contamination until the 5th week after processing.
Enterobacteriaceae in general, and Salmonella in particular, have been found variably resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracyclines and sulfonamides in humans for several years (Molbak et al.
Gram-negative isolates were classified as Enterobacteriaceae based on their listing in a standard microbiological text[65] and as non-Enterobacteriaceae if they were not in this list.
A snapshot of the global therapeutic scenario for Enterobacteriaceae Infections.
The INFORM program represents Allergan's significant commitment to investing in research that advances our understanding of the prevalence, impact and appropriate management of infections caused by resistant Gram-negative pathogens, such as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)," said David Melnick, M.