Enterobacter


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Related to Enterobacter: Enterobacteriaceae, enterococcus, Citrobacter, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes

Enterobacter

 [en″ter-o-bak´ter]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms are widely distributed in nature and occur in the intestinal tracts of humans and animals. They are frequently a cause of nosocomial infections.

Enterobacter

(en'tĕr-ō-bak'tĕr),
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore-forming, motile bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative rods. The cells are peritrichous, and some strains have encapsulated cells. Glucose is fermented with the production of acid and gas. The Voges-Proskauer test result is usually positive. Gelatin is slowly liquefied by the most commonly occurring forms (Enterobacter cloacae). These organisms occur in the feces of humans and other animals and in sewage, soil, water, and dairy products; recognized as an agent of common nosocomial infections of the urinary tract, lungs, or blood; somewhat resistant to antibiotics. This genus characteristically acquires resistance rapidly in part because of the presence of inducible β-lactamases; the type species is Enterobacter cloacae.

Enterobacter

/En·tero·bac·ter/ (en´ter-o-bak″ter) a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod-shaped bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae, widely distributed in nature and occurring in the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Species including E. aero´genes, E. agglo´merans, E. cloa´cae, and E. gergo´viae, are frequently the cause of nosocomial infection, arising from contaminated medical devices and personnel.

En·ter·o·bac·ter

(en'tĕr-ō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore-forming, motile bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative rods. The cells are peritrichous, and some strains have encapsulated cells. Glucose is fermented with the production of acid and gas. The Voges-Proskauer test result is usually positive. These organisms occur in the feces of humans and other animals and in sewage, soil, water, and dairy products; recognized as an agent of common nosocomial infections of the urinary tract, lungs, or blood; somewhat resistant to antibiotics. This genus characteristically acquires resistance rapidly, in part because of the presence of inducible beta-lactamases. The type species is E. cloacae.

Enterobacter

a genus of straight gram-negative rods, lactose-fermenting bacteria of the tribe Klebsielleae of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Found chiefly in the environment in water and soil but are common invaders of tissues in contaminated wounds of animals and in opportunistic infections such as cystitis and pyelonephritis in cattle. E. aerogenes (syn. Klebsiella mobilis) is occasionally a cause of bovine mastitis, uterine infections in mares and the mastitis-metritis-agalactia syndrome in sows.

Enterobacter cloacae
occasionally isolated from dogs and cats with septicemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
sakazakii (95/95) were detected on the new Oxoid Chromogenic Enterobacter sakazakii Agar (DFI formulation) two days sooner than the alternative method.
Clinical characteristics and outcomes of infants with invasive Enterobacter sakazakii disease.
First Isolation of blaIMI-2 in an Enterobacter cloacae clinical isolate from China.
Co-production of 16S rRNA methylases and extended-spectrum [beta]-lactamases in AmpC-producing Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens in Korea.
Cluster of neonatal infections in Jerusalem due to unusual biochemical variant of Enterobacter sakazakii.
Bloodstream infections caused by Enterobacter species: Predictors of 30-day mortality rate and impact of broad-spectrum cephalosporin resistance on outcome.
Distribution of aerobic bacterial isolates from jejunal fluid and faecal samples Bacterial isolates Jejunal fluid Faecal samples (n= 100) (n=77) Escherichia coli 3 4 Citrobacter sp 3 0 Salmonella sp 3 2 Proteus sp, 5 1 Enterobacter sp 4 1 Staphylococcus sp 1 0 Acinetobacter sp 8 0 Pseudomonas aeruginosa 26 3 Serratia marcescens 11 0 Klebsiella sp, 9 0 Streptococcus sp 1 0
is alerting the public against applying the company's TMM brand Fortified Mineral Neutralizer and Ultra Fortified Mineral Neutralizer to the eyes because these products may be contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas flourescens/putida and Enterobacter cloacae - bacteria that, if applied to the eyes, might lead to serious injury, including possible blindness.
9% of Enterobacter aerogenes (ATCC 13408) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) (Staph) on carpets[sup.
aureus (MRSA) C 8 Enterobacter cloacae C 9 Klebsiella pneumoniae K 10 K.
Detection of extended spectrum [beta]-lactamases in clinical isolates of Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter aerogenes.