enol

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Related to Enolate: Claisen condensation

enol

 [e´nol]
an organic compound in which one carbon of a double-bonded pair is also attached to a hydroxyl group, thus a tautomer of the ketone form. The term is also used as a prefix or infix, often italicized.

e·nol

(ē'nol),
A compound possessing a hydroxyl group (alcohol) attached to a doubly bonded (ethylenic) carbon atom (-CH=CH(OH)-); properly italicized when attached as a prefix or infix to an otherwise complete name, for example, enolpyruvate, phosphoenolpyruvate; usually in equilibrium with its keto tautomer.
[-ene + -ol]

enol

(e´nol) an organic compound in which one carbon of a double-bonded pair is also attached to a hydroxyl group, thus a tautomer of the ketone form; also used as a prefix or infix, often italicized.

enol

[ē′nol]
an organic compound with an alcohol or hydroxyl group directly attached (bonded) to a double bond. By transfer of the hydrogen atom from oxygen to carbon, the enol form becomes the (usually more stable) keto form. Such compounds usually exist as enol-keto tautomers.

e·nol

(ē'nol)
A compound possessing a hydroxyl group (alcohol) attached to a doubly bonded (ethylenic) carbon atom (-CH=CH(OH)-).
[-ene + -ol]

enol

one of two tautomeric forms of a substance, the other being the keto form; the enol is formed from the keto by migration of hydrogen from the adjacent carbon atom to the carbonyl group.
References in periodicals archive ?
From simple Dreiding mechanical molecular models it can be seen that the ester group X' in the "favoured" configuration is sterically not hindering double bond of the enolate and this determines the face of oxidation, while the ester group X in the other conformation makes it "unfavoured".
The asymmetric generation of [alpha]-hydroxy ketones has been achieved by oxidation of silyl enolates of ketones by using salen-type catalysts [18] and oxidants such as NaOCl, N-oxides, etc.
Also, the oxidation of alkyl enolates using hindered salen-type catalysts with different oxidizing agents has been successfully applied in order to get [alpha]-hydroxy ketones (Fig.
Combustion fuel additives comprising metal enolates.
In the area of methodology, the emphasis is on photocycloaddition-fragmentation reactions, new applications of the Diels-Alder reaction, development of synthetically useful phosphorus-containing reagents, chemical reactivity of Ce(III) enolates, and synthetic application of thiol esters.
This volume features a comprehensive treatment of transition metal (palladium, nickel, copper) catalyzed a-arylation of enolates derived from many common functional groups such as ketones, aldehydes, esters and nitriles (Prim, Marque, Gaucher, Campagne) including enantioselective variants; palladium catalyzed cyclization to form indoles (Cacchi, Fabrizi, Goggiamani) one of the most prevalent and important classes of heterocycles in natural products and pharmaceutical agents; and an overview of a newly developed dihydroxylation reaction of alkenes (Donohoe, Bataille, Innocenti) that uses hydrogen bonding interactions to direct the delivery of an osmium catalyst with high selectivity.