Braille

(redirected from English braille)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

braille

 [brāl]
an alphabet system for the blind, consisting of raised dots that can be felt with the fingertip.
Braille alphabet based on six-dot system. From Stein et al., 2000.

braille

(brāl),
A system of writing and printing by means of raised dots corresponding to letters, numbers, and punctuation to enable the blind to read by touch.
[Louis Braille, French teacher of blind, 1809-1852]

Braille

[brāl, brä′yə]
Etymology: Louis Braille, French teacher of the blind, 1809-1852
a system of printing for the blind consisting of raised dots or points that can be read by touch.

Braille

Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief, so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication.

Braille

Public health Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication. Cf Americans with Disabilities Act, Service dog.

braille

A method of coding information using groups of six raised spots embossed on paper, to enable the blind to read through touch. (Louis Braille, 1809–1852, French school teacher).

Braille,

Louis, French educator, 1809-1852.
Braille - system of raised dots placed in patterns to allow the blind to read.
Braillophone - a combination telephone and braille system.

Braille 

System of printing for blind persons, consisting of points raised above the surface of the paper used as symbols to indicate the letters of the alphabet. Reading is accomplished by touching the points with the fingertips.

Braille (brāl),

n.pr a printing and writing system using elevated dots to represent letters. The system allows those individuals with limited or no visual ability to read via touch.
References in periodicals archive ?
The transition to the Unified English Braille Code (UEB) in the United States will not happen overnight.
Depending on the approach to bilingual instruction, this support includes at least preparation of materials in both English braille and in the student's native language.
The Unified English Braille (UEB) code contains no new literary contractions; the changes to the literary code involved the elimination of nine contractions and changes in spacing.
They also stated that what other countries decide to do in relation to adopting UEB will make a difference because UEB is supposed to unify English Braille around the world.
The story of CBC's development may well continue with the ongoing work of unifying the English braille codes.
EBAE requires that the two "do"s be brailled differently in contracted braille, the most widely used form of English braille in which many words and letter groups are written in a shortened form.
A Perkins Braillewriter was used to write the 26 English braille letters.
The kit also includes an English braille symbols chart and an activity guide and is available for $30.
7 also features updated translations for a number of braille codes, including those of the Braille Authority of North America (BANA), Braille Authority of the United Kingdom (BAUK); as well as updated translations for Unified English Braille Code (UEBC) and French braille; and new translations and templates for European Blind Union Pharma and Esperanto.