energy

(redirected from Energy(Earth Sciences))
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

energy

 [en´er-je]
power that may be translated into motion, overcoming resistance or causing a physical change; the ability to do work. Energy assumes several forms; it may be thermal (in the form of heat), electrical, mechanical, chemical, radiant, or kinetic. In doing work, the energy is changed from one form to one or more other form(s). In these changes some of the energy is “lost” in the sense that it cannot be recaptured and used again. Usually there is loss in the form of heat, which escapes or is dissipated unused; all energy changes give off a certain amount of heat.ƒ

All activities of the body require energy, and all needs are met by the consumption of food containing energy in chemical form. The human diet comprises three main sources of energy: carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Of these three, carbohydrates most readily provide the kind of energy needed to activate muscles. Proteins work to build and restore body tissues. The body transforms chemical energy derived from food by the process of metabolism, an activity that takes place in the individual cell. Molecules of the food substances providing energy pass through the cell wall. Inside the cell, chemical reactions occur that produce the new forms of energy and yield by-products such as water and waste materials; see also adenosine triphosphate.
free energy (Gibbs free energy (G)) the energy equal to the maximum amount of work that can be obtained from a process occurring under conditions of fixed temperature and pressure.
nuclear energy energy that can be liberated by changes in the nucleus of an atom (as by fission of a heavy nucleus or by fusion of light nuclei into heavier ones with accompanying loss of mass).

en·er·gy (E),

(en'ĕr-jē),
The exertion of power; the capacity to do work, taking the forms of kinetic energy, potential energy, chemical energy, electrical energy, etc.
Synonym(s): dynamic force
[G. energeia, fr. en, in, + ergon, work]

energy

/en·er·gy/ (en´er-je) power which may be translated into motion, overcoming resistance, or effecting physical change; the ability to do work. Symbol E.
free energy , Gibbs free energy (G ) that equal to the maximum amount of work that can be obtained from a process occurring under conditions of fixed temperature and pressure.
kinetic energy  the energy of motion.
nuclear energy  energy that can be liberated by changes in the nucleus of an atom (as by fission of a heavy nucleus or fusion of light nuclei into heavier ones with accompanying loss of mass).
potential energy  energy at rest or not manifested in actual work.
vital energy  see under force.

energy

[en′ərjē]
Etymology: Gk, energia
the capacity to do work or to perform vigorous activity. Energy may occur in the form of heat, light, movement, sound, or radiation. Human energy is usually expressed as muscle contractions and heat production, made possible by the metabolism of food that originally acquired the energy from sunlight. Chemical energy is that released as a result of a chemical reaction, as in the metabolism of food. Compare anergia. energetic, adj.

energy

The capacity to do work, measured in joules Types Potential/stored energy, kinetic/in motion energy. See Activation energy, Adaptation energy, Binding energy, Biomass energy, Bond dissociation energy, Department of Energy, Orgone energy.

en·er·gy

(E) (en'ĕr-jē)
The exertion of power; the capacity to do work, taking the forms of kinetic energy, potential energy, chemical energy, electrical energy, and other types.
[G. energeia, fr. en, in, + ergon, work]

energy

The capacity of a body to do work. Energy occurs in several forms-potential as in a compressed spring or a mass in a high position, kinetic as in motion, chemical as in petroleum and nuclear as in the binding forces of the atomic nucleus. Its effect, when manifested, is to bring about a change of some kind. The term is also used metaphorically to refer to human vitality and appetite for exertion or work.

energy

the capacity of a body or system to do work. The most important energy forms, as far as living organisms are concerned, are heat, radiant, chemical and mechanical energy. Energy units of importance are:

The quantity of solar energy entering the earth's atmosphere is 64.3×108 J m-2 yr-1. The amount of solar energy available to plants in Britain is 10.5×108 J m-2 yr-1. The SI UNIT of energy is the joule (J). In plants and animals, energy is stored in ATP (short-term storage), and starch and FAT (long-term storage).

energy

the capacity to do work. Includes kinetic, gravitational, potential, elastic potential, heat, sound, chemical, nuclear. Measured in joules (J) or calories.

energy,

n the capability to do work or produce an effect.
energy exchange,
n in energy medicine, the relation between two human (usually practitioner and patient) fields of energy. Also called
transfer.
energy field,
n any force that can do work or produce an effect at a distance.
Enlarge picture
Energy field.
energy psychology,
n a treatment approach that combines a wide range of behavioral psychology theory with concepts informed by bioenergy research and perspectives.
energy psychotherapy,
n discipline which holds that the causes of negative emotions can be traced to disruptions in the energy system of the human body.
energy scanning,
n in traditional Chinese Medicine and energy medicine, a diagnostic tool in which the practitioner passes his or her hands over the client's body in order to scan, see, and interpret the patient's aura.
energy shielding,
n creation of a safe haven in which one's inner peace and energies—psychic and emotional—are protected using focused breathing and visualization.
energy, cold,
n an energetic style characterized by low metabolism, passive behavior, pale complexion, dislike of cold weather, and finicky eating.
energy, healing,
n energy that has a beneficial effect on the health of an organism.
energy, hot,
n an energetic style characterized by high metabolism, active behavior, red complexion, large appetite and thirst, dislike of hot weather, restlessness, light sleep, heavy sweating, and irritability.
energy, muscle,
n an osteopathic treatment in which the patient's muscular force is used in cooperation with the motions performed by the physician.
energy, orgone (ōr·gōn enˑ·er·gē),
n an intelligent, primordial energy that permeates all living things and the biosphere, as described by psy-chiatrist Wilhelm Reich.
energy, pulsed muscle,
n therapeutic technique that uses tiny, rapid resisted contractions at the movement barrier. Effects include mechanical pumping, postisometric relaxation (PIR), and reciprocal inhibition (RI). See also postisometric relaxation and reciprocal inhibition.
energy, state of,
n the quality of a patient's vitality as indicated through various signs.
energy, subtle,
n the modern term for
vital energy or the substance which permeates the environment and all living things.
energy, vibrating (vīˑ·brā·ting enˑ·er·jē),
n oscillating unseen system of power or energy believed to be derived from sources inside and outside the human body. In many healing models, it is believed that these waves of power can be altered or manipulated to bring about healing. See also absent healing, laying-on-hands healing, and SHEN therapy.
energy, vital,
n in homeopathy, the energy that imbues the body and mind, which is the ultimate focus of homeopathic treatment. Also called
vital spirit.

en·er·gy

(en'ĕr-jē)
Exertion of power; capacity to do work.
[G. energeia, fr. en, in, + ergon, work]

energy,

n the capacity for doing work.
energy, atomic,
n the energy that can be liberated by changes in the nucleus of an atom.
energy binding,
n the energy represented by the difference in mass between the sum of the component parts and the actual mass of the nucleus of an atom.
energy dependence,
n the characteristic response of a radiation detector to a given range of radiation energies or wavelengths as compared with the response of a standard free-air chamber. Emulsions also show energy dependence.
energy excitation,
n the energy required to change a system from its ground state to an excited state. With each excited state there is associated a different excitation energy. See also excitation.
energy ionizing,
n the average energy lost by ionizing radiation in producing an ion pair in a gas. (For air, ionizing energy is approximately 33 V.)
energy kinetic,
n the energy possessed by a mass because of its motion.
energy nuclear,
n See energy, atomic.
energy photon (hv),
n the electromagnetic energy in the form of photons, with a value in ergs equal to the product of their frequency in cycles per second and Planck's constant (E-hv).
energy potential,
n the energy inherent in a mass because of its position with reference to other masses.
energy radiant,
n the energy of electromagnetic waves, such as radio waves, visible light, radiographs, and gamma rays.

energy

power that may be translated into motion, overcoming resistance, or effecting physical change; the ability to do work. Energy assumes several forms; it may be thermal (in the form of heat), electrical, mechanical, chemical, radiant or kinetic. In doing work, the energy is changed from one form to another or to several forms. In these changes some of the energy is 'lost' in the sense that it cannot be recaptured and used again. Usually there is loss in the form of heat, which escapes or is dissipated unused. All energy changes give off a certain amount of the energy as heat.
All activities of the body require energy, and all needs are met by the consumption of food containing energy in chemical form. The animal diet comprises three main sources of energy: carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Of these three, carbohydrates most readily provide the kind of energy needed to activate muscles. Proteins work to build and restore body tissues. The body transforms chemical energy derived from food by the process of metabolism, an activity that takes place in the individual cell. Molecules of the food substances providing energy pass through the cell membrane. Inside the cell, chemical reactions occur that produce the new forms of energy and yield by-products such as water and waste materials. See also adenosine.

dietary energy
the total energy intake in the diet is the gross energy. Digestible energy is gross energy less fecal energy. Metabolizable energy is digestible energy less that lost in fermentation in the gut, energy lost in urine. Net energy is metabolizable energy less energy used in specific dynamic action response. Expressed as joules, calories or occasionally therms (1 calorie=4.18 joule).
energy density
see caloric density.
energy feeds
feeds with a high carbohydrate content and therefore low fiber (<18%) and="" protein=""><20%)>
free energy
the energy equal to the maximum amount of work that can be obtained from a process occurring under conditions of fixed temperature and pressure.
nuclear energy
energy that can be liberated by changes in the nucleus of an atom (as by fission of a heavy nucleus or by fusion of light nuclei into heavier ones with accompanying loss of mass).
nutritional energy deficiency
causes loss of body weight, milk, egg and wool production. Continued for long periods or severe restriction causes particular metabolic upsets in pregnant and lactating ewes and cows—see pregnancy toxemia, acetonemia (2); in neonates, hypoglycemia. In others causes emaciation, inanition, starvation.
energy production
production of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation or anaerobic glycolysis.
energy requirements
generally vary between species and particularly between individuals. They are determined by many factors, especially age, level of activity, physiological status and body size, specifically body surface area. The basal energy requirement (BER) is the level required by a healthy animal at complete rest in a neutral environmental temperature. It can be calculated by using several formulae, based on body weight or body surface area, which is then used in the further calculation of the maintenance energy requirement (MER) which takes into account the individual animal's level of activity or disease status.
energy reserves
any reduced carbon stored in compounds such as fatty acids in triacylglycerols of adipose tissue, glucose in glycogen, and amino acids in protein releases energy, ultimately in the form of ATP on oxidation of the carbon.
energy transfer
conversion of energy from one form usually chemical in the form of ATP to another usually chemical, but can be electrical, mechanical or heat energy.

Patient discussion about energy

Q. Is energy drinks really boost my energy? Now-a-days the sale of the energy drinks have grown high. Is energy drinks really boost my energy?

A. People have a mind set that energy drinks really boost them to do work or to relax more. Actually energy drinks may give you a temporary energy boost. The "boost" typically comes from the large amount of sugar and caffeine these drinks contain. Although the various sugars used to sweeten energy drinks can briefly increase energy, consuming large quantities of sugar is likely to cause weight gain. Caffeine is a stimulant, which also can temporarily perk you up. But too much caffeine can cause adverse side effects, such as nervousness, irritability, increased heart rate and blood pressure, and insomnia.

Energy drinks are not necessarily bad for your health. But you shouldn't see them as some "natural" energy boost — the boost they give is from caffeine. Some of the claims made by manufacturers of energy drinks — such as "improves performance and increases concentration" — can be misleading.
Consider a better way to boost your energy: Get adequate sleep,

Q. HOW DO ENERGYS EFFECT THE BODY? POSITIVE, NEGITIVE, CHI, ELOPTIC, LIFE FORCE ENERGY.

A. Not really my area, but you can try and ask in the alternative medicine community (http://www.imedix.com/Alternative_Medicine).

You can read about these things here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pioneers_in_radionics, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%27i

Q. I suffer of lack in energy lately, any advice? I’m 35, usually a strong guy but for the past 3 weeks I’ve been sleeping all day, doing nothing while awake, having no energy to do anything. Any one know a reason or what should I do?

A. Have you tried changing your diet? You may lack of vitamins or other essential materials that can cause drowsiness. Try eating vegetables and fruits. Force yourself to do a daily walk, 25 minutes, that’s all. and could be you got an infection that will take some time…

More discussions about energy
Full browser ?