endosome

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en·do·some

(en'dō-sōm),
A more or less central body in the vesicular nucleus of certain Feulgen-negative (DNA-) protozoa (for example, trypanosomes, parasitic amebae, and phytoflagellates), with the chromatin (DNA+) lying between the nuclear membrane and the endosome. Compare: nucleolus.
[endo- + G. sōma, body]

endosome

/en·do·some/ (en´do-sōm)
1. in endocytosis, a vesicle that has lost its coat of clathrin.
2. a nucleolus-like, intranuclear, RNA-containing organelle of certain flagellate protozoa that persists during mitosis.

en·do·some

(en'dō-sōm)
A more or less central body in the vesicular nucleus of certain Feulgen-negative protozoa (e.g., trypanosomes, parasitic amebae, and phytoflagellates), with the chromatin lying between the nuclear membrane and the endosome.
[endo- + G. sōma, body]

endosome

intracellular vesicles formed from the cell membrane which are involved in intracellular transport.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two pore channels are unusual calcium channels found in endosomes that control the way endosomes move through cells and the environment of the cells.
To successfully infect a cell, the virus needs to be transported deep within it in order to break out of bubble-like intracellular transport structures called endosomes that carry the virus within the cell.
In addition, the fusogenicity of PHIS could disrupt the enveloped membrane of acidic subcellular compartments such as endosomes thus resulting in endosomal escape [13].
To this end we have curated a list of 1,187 genes representing ER, Golgi, Endosomes and Lysosomes (EGEL) around which we develop independent but interconnected approaches: (i) RNA-seq and antibody microarrays to identify co-regulated MTMs; (ii) high-content siRNA screening to define functional MTMs; (iii) epistatic functional analysis between EGEL genes and five membrane trafficking disease genes (TRAPPC2 in chondrocytes, Sec23A in osteoblasts, OCRL and CLCN5 in proximal tubular epithelial kidney cells, and VAPB in neuronal cells); and (iv) studies of protein-protein interactions to generate functional and physical networks centered on the disease genes.
Dynein, a motor protein, transports endosomes to another structure called a lysosome, which destroys the endosome and its dangerous cargo.
On the other hand, exosomes are produced by a more complex inward budding of endosomes (1).
TLRs 1,2,4,5,6 and 11 are located on the plasma membrane of cells of the innate immune system and epithelial cells and recognise a range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns found on the cell-wall of bacteria, including lipopeptides (TLRs1 and 6), lipoteichoic acids and lipoproteins (TLR2), lipopolysaccharides (TLR4), and bacterial flagellin (TLR5), while TLR11 interacts with less well-defined ligands on uropathogenic bacteria; (3) the remaining TLRs are located cytoplasmically in endosomes where they interact with viral double-stranded (TLR3) and singlestranded RNA (TLRs7 and 8), and with bacterial and viral DNA via interactions with so-called unmethylated CpG sites (TLR9), which are rarely encountered on the human genome.
For example, oxidatively modified proteins hampered the function of endosomes, the cell's organelle where pathogens are inactivated.
Moreover, ClC5 is mainly expressed in the early endosomes of the renal proximal tubule and intercalated cells of the cortical collecting duct (Jentsch et al.
2 Converts Fe+1 to (TSAP6) Fe+2 in endosomes IRP1 100880 1RP1 9p22-pl3 Bifunctional (ACOl) protein, acts as aconitase or iron response protein due to cellular iron levels IRP2 147582 IRP2 15q25.
The researchers found that endosomes carrying crocidolite fibers 5 micrometers or smaller quickly begin speeding toward the cell nucleus via microtubules -- elaborate, filamentous roadways along which the cell shuttles its inner "vehicles.
Reversible chemical masking of the polymers so that membrane-lytic activity is revealed only in the acidic environment of endosomes, and