endorphins


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Related to endorphins: dopamine, serotonin

en·dor·phins

(en-dōr'finz, en'dōr-finz),
Opioid peptides originally isolated from the brain but now found in many parts of the body; in the nervous system, endorphins bind to the same receptors that bind exogenous opiates. A variety of endorphins (for example, α, β, and γ) that vary not only in their physical and chemical properties but also in physiologic action have been isolated.
See also: enkephalins.
[fr. endogenous morphine]

endorphins

A number of morphine-like peptide substances naturally produced in the body and for which morphine receptors exist in the brain. Many of these active substances have been found, all with the same opioid core of five amino acids. They are neurotransmitters and have a wide range of functions. They help to regulate heart action, general hormone function, the mechanisms of shock from blood loss and the perception of pain, and are probably involved in controlling mood, emotion and motivation. They are thought to be produced under various circumstances in which acute relief of pain or mental distress is required. At least some of the endorphins are produced by the PITUITARY gland as part of the precursor of the ACTH molecule. Endorphins are fragments cleaved from the beta-lipotropin component of proopiomelanocortin (POMC). The term derives from the phrase ‘endogenous morphines’.

Endorphins

Pain-killing substances produced in the human body and released by stress or trauma. Some researchers think that people who mutilate themselves are trying to trigger the release of endorphins.

endorphins

group of opioid peptides made in nerve cells in the brain and released from their axons as neurotransmitters or neurohormones, which bind to and activate opioid receptors of other cells (where opioid drugs also act). The first to be identified in brain tissue (1970s) were named enkephalins; many more were later identified. They are released in strenuous exercise and in stressful or painful situations. Subgroups have varied and widespread actions, diminishing the sensation of pain, inducing euphoria (e.g. 'runner's high') and interacting with the immune system.

endorphins

naturally occurring opioids liberated within brain, spinal cord and peripheral tissues during exercise; interact with tissue opiate receptors, inducing pain reduction, euphoria and general well-being

endorphins,

n.pl polypeptides produced in the body that bind the neuroreceptors in brain and act on the central and peripheral nervous system to alleviate pain.

en·dor·phins

(en-dōr'finz)
Opioid peptides originally isolated from the brain but now found in many parts of the body.

endorphins (endor´fins),

n.pl substances produced in the brain and pituitary gland that reduce pain sensations by binding to receptors in the nervous system. The three endorphins, called alpha-, beta-, and gamma-endorphin, are subsequences of the 91-amino-acid peptide hormone, beta-lipotropin.
References in periodicals archive ?
When endorphins, our body's naturally made opioids, are released or when opioid drugs, including medications, are taken, they bind to opioid receptors in the brain and body to regulate functions including pain, pleasure, breathing, and digestion.
This UV light-seeking behavior seemed to hinge on endorphins: When people's endorphins were blocked with a different drug called naltrexone, they no longer distinguished between the real and fake tanning beds, a failure that suggests they had become immune to the rewards of UV light.
Endorphin release may allow you to exercise more, too.
The endorphins that are released during an orgasm closely resemble morphine, and they effectively relieve pain," said Meston.
The discovery of the precise locations in the brain where endorphins are released provides a possible target for the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of alcohol abuse, said senior author Howard L.
Endorphin rushes, like G-spots, don't exist, or at least they don't in Quinton, where I found myself at a temporary council gym.
A psychologist has claimed that watching funny stuff on TV is good for us, because our laughter releases feelgood endorphins.
Smiling releases endorphins and makes us feel better - even faking a smile can lead to feeling happier.
Masturbation helps you relax, boosts endorphins (the brain's "happy chemicals") and can ease PMS and menstrual cramps.
When we exercise, endorphins are produced in the brain and re leased into the body.
Plus, it promotes the production of endorphins in the skin--neuropeptides with neurotransmitter action.
To make sure that your are going to have a physiological response -- a release of endorphins -- happy hormones that also increase energy production -- you should be walking fast enough that your heart rate is between 65 percent and 80 percent of your maximum heart rate.