endorphin

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endorphin

 [en-dor´fin]
one of a group of opiate-like peptides produced naturally by the body at neural synapses at various points in the central nervous system pathways, where they modulate the transmission of pain perceptions. The term endorphin was coined by combining the words endogenous and morphine. Like morphine, endorphins raise the pain threshold and produce sedation and euphoria; the effects are blocked by naloxone, a narcotic antagonist.

endorphin

/en·dor·phin/ (en-dor´fin) any of three neuropeptides, α-, β-, and γ-endorphins; they are amino acid residues of β-lipotropin that bind to opiate receptors in various areas of the brain and have potent analgesic effect.

endorphin

(ĕn-dôr′fĭn)
n.
Any of a group of peptide hormones that bind to opioid receptors and act as neurotransmitters. Endorphins reduce the sensation of pain and affect emotions.

endorphin

[endôr′fin]
Etymology: Gk, endon + morphe, shape
one of the three groups of endogenous opioid peptides composed of many amino acids, elaborated by the pituitary gland and other brain areas, and acting on the central and the peripheral nervous systems to reduce pain. There are three known, designated alpha, beta, and gamma. Beta-endorphin has been isolated in the brain and in the GI tract and seems to be the most potent of the endorphins. Beta-endorphin is composed of 30 amino acids that are identical to part of the sequence of 91 amino acids of the hormone beta-lipotropin, also produced by the pituitary gland. Behavioral tests indicate that beta-endorphin is a powerful analgesic in humans and animals. Brain-stimulated analgesia in humans releases beta-endorphin into the cerebrospinal fluid. Compare enkephalin.

endorphin

Physiology An endogenous opioid–eg, endorphin, leu-enkephalin, met-enkephalin, dynorphin; each binds to a cognate receptor; endorphins act as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, they are concentrated in the brain and associated with analgesia. See Enkephalin, Neuropeptide, Neurotransmitter, POMC.

en·dor·phin

(ĕn-dōr'fĭn)
A natural substance produced in the brain that binds to opioid receptors, thus dulling the perception of pain; postulated to trigger "exercise high," a state of euphoria and exhilaration during intense exercise.

endorphin

a small protein produced in the nervous system of vertebrates exhibiting actions similar to morphine.

endorphin

one of a group of opiate-like peptides produced naturally by the body at neural synapses at various points in the central nervous system pathways where they modulate the transmission of pain perceptions. The term endorphin was coined by combining the words endogenous and morphine. Like morphine, endorphins raise the pain threshold and produce sedation and euphoria; the effects are blocked by naloxone, a narcotic antagonist.
References in periodicals archive ?
Termal tedavi endorfin ve ACTH konsantrasyonu azalmasina bagli olarak aciklanamayan serum kortizon seviyesi dusuklugu ile immunsupresif etki gosterir (4).
com, Merlin and AFR Midnight Rambler have each been entered for the Rolex Sydney Hobart Race, as has the third placegetter in the IRC Division, Endorfin, Peter Mooney's Sydney 47CR, also from the CYCA.
Although she has to take a painkiller before each concert, she believes that on-stage adrenalin rush stimulates the production of endorfins, which are natural painkillers.