Endometrial polyps


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Endometrial polyps

A growth in the lining of the uterus (endometrium) that may cause bleeding and can develop into cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In gynecological practice, 3D and 4D ultrasound are now being used to detect structural problems of the uterus and diagnose ovarian tumors, endometrial polyps, and fibroids.
Maternal anatomic factors, including congenital uterine abnormalities, endometrial polyps, uterine fibroids, adhesions, hydrosalpinges, endometriosis, etc.
They also have improved reciprocating blades that enable the resection of myomas in addition to endometrial polyps.
Although this process is tightly controlled, uterine cells sometimes proliferate abnormally, leading to menstrual irregularities, endometrial polyps, endometriosis, or endometrial cancer - the most common female genital tract malignancy, causing six percent of cancer deaths among women in the U.
Endometrial polyps are typically seen in postmenopausal women.
8) However, despite the strict diagnostic criteria for EIN, at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, Massachusetts), a number of benign mimics, such as endometrial polyps, secretory change, tubal metaplasia, and squamous morular metaplasia, continue to cause considerable diagnostic uncertainty.
Endometrial polyps are localised hyperplastic overgrowths of glands and stroma that form a projection above the uterine surface.
1,2) The incidence of endometrial polyps, hyperplasia and endometrial cancer has been reported to be between 5 and 35%, 4.
There is also promise of prevention of endometrial carcinoma, endometrial polyps, infertility, and perhaps adenomyosis.
Other complications in women with these disorders include an increased risk of endometriosis, endometrial polyps and haemorrhagic ovarian cysts.
10) Other benign uterine growths in the differential include adenomyosis (endometrial glands infiltrating the myometrial wall), endometrial polyps (a common cause of peri- and postmenopausal bleeding), and endometrial hyperplasia.
For gynecology patients, the technology offers three-dimensional images of uterine abnormalities such as endometrial polyps and the precise location of fibroid tumors in the endometrium.