ligand

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ligand

 [li´gand, lig´and]
an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

lig·and

(lig'and, lī'gand),
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds, for example, the porphyrin portion of heme, the corrin nucleus of the B12 vitamins.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, for example, a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, for example, a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
5. An atom or group covalently attached to a specified carbon atom in an organic molecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

/li·gand/ (li´gand) (lig´and) an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

ligand

(lī′gənd, lĭg′ənd)
n.
An ion, molecule, or molecular group that binds to another chemical entity to form a larger complex.

ligand

[lig′ənd, lī′gənd]
Etymology: L, ligare, to bind
1 a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central metal atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in oxyhemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2 an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a cell surface or to a tracer element. The binding is reversible in a competitive binding assay. It may be the analyte or a cross-reactant. Examples include vitamin B12, a ligand with intrinsic factor as the binding protein, and various antigens, which are ligands with antibody-binding proteins.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. An organic molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, e.g., a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, e.g., a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

A MOLECULE or ION that binds to a central chemical entity by non-covalent bonds. A general term for any molecule that is recognized by a surface receptor.

ligand

a molecule able to bind to a specific ANTIBODY and used to distinguish closely similar types of antibody.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

(līgənd),
n 1. a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in hemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2. an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a surface or to a tracer element.

ligand

an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or part of a molecule that specifically binds to form a complex with another molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, endogenous ligands generated during joint inflammation can activate TLR pathway and perpetuate joint damage.
The mechanism of action is defined by vertebrate ERs, which bind phytoestrogen ligands, endogenous ligands, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with specific affinity.
The Endocannabinoid System mainly comprises two receptors (CB1 and CB2), two endogenous ligands and two metabolism enzymes.
The mechanisms implicated in the interactions between opioids and cannabinoids involve several components of these systems, including alteration of the levels of endogenous ligands as well as their respective receptors.
polysaccharides) by mimicking endogenous ligands it may be worth to investigate EPs 7630 on the occurrence of carbohydrates.
Following the discovery of cannabinoid receptors in mammals (1, 2, 3), endogenous ligands for these receptors ("endocannabinoids") have also been identified; these ligands include arachidonylethanolamide ("anandamide") and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) (4, 5, 6).
In these experiments, more than 15 of the predicted novel peptides demonstrated modulation of various GPCRs of clinical interest including some for which there are no known endogenous ligands.

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