endocrine disruptor

(redirected from Endocrine disruptor chemical)

endocrine disruptor

A substance which interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action or elimination of natural hormones in the body that are responsible for development, behaviour, fertility and maintenance of homeostasis (normal cell metabolism).

Examples
DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls, bisphenol A, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, phthalates.

endocrine disruptor

(dĭs-rŭp′tĕr)
A chemical that may imitate or block the function of natural hormones if it is absorbed by the body. Many pesticides and plasticizing compounds, e.g., phthalates, are thought to disrupt endocrine pathways, esp. if they are absorbed by pregnant women during embryonic and fetal development.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mohammed Abu Al-Ainain, UAEU); Harnessing solar energy and green chemical approaches for the degradation of endocrine disruptor chemicals present in ground and wastewater (Dr.
It addresses the future demands humans will place on the world in terms of energy, material availability, and pollution; sustainability, business, and the plastics industry; basic information on plastics and their elements; plastic production; the societal benefits of plastics; their degradation in the environment; endocrine disruptor chemicals used in the plastics industry; the health impacts of plastics; managing plastic waste; and plastics in the oceans.