endocrine disruptor

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endocrine disruptor

A substance which interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action or elimination of natural hormones in the body that are responsible for development, behaviour, fertility and maintenance of homeostasis (normal cell metabolism).

Examples
DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls, bisphenol A, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, phthalates.

endocrine disruptor

(dĭs-rŭp′tĕr)
A chemical that may imitate or block the function of natural hormones if it is absorbed by the body. Many pesticides and plasticizing compounds, e.g., phthalates, are thought to disrupt endocrine pathways, esp. if they are absorbed by pregnant women during embryonic and fetal development.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some phthalates have been linked to endocrine disruption and developmental and reproductive toxicity so preventing harmful ones ending up in toys and other childcare items is a priority.
The NFU's response to the ED consultation included five main arguments: Plant protection product regulation |should be based on sound evidence and an active should only be identified as an ED following a full assessment of the risk it presents; Current regulation of EDs is already |too focused on hazard, as demonstrated by the findings of the Andersons report, which highlighted the scenario of product loss without any further restriction; The work of AHDB demonstrates that |a precautionary approach to endocrine disruption will be extremely damaging for UK farmers' and growers' productivity.
Either way, some have been linked to endocrine disruption, heart disease, cancer and a wide range of other health issues.
Within the past century, in excess of 80,000 new chemicals have been manufactured and utilised in ways that have resulted in extensive human exposure, with a percentage of these chemicals being identified as toxic due to their ability to cause endocrine disruption [1].
All participants had in their bodies, chemicals listed for priority regulation by the American Environmental Protection Agency and associated with chronic illness such as cancer and endocrine disruption (see box "Bad Medicine").
Under the applications, the market is segmented into systemic toxicity, dermal toxicity, ocular toxicity, endocrine disruption (reproductive & developmental toxicity) and others.
Among the topics are the cardiovascular system, membranes and metabolism, oxygen sensing, intestinal transport, endocrine disruption, the physiology of social stress in fish, pain perception, chemoreception, cardiac regeneration, and neuronal regeneration.
As a consequence of this new understanding, a group of scientists that study endocrine disruption worked together to update and refine a 2007 review of the low dose effects of BPA.
Unfortunately, endocrine disruption of this sort may lead to catastrophic effects on growth, development, behavior, and even fecundity in exposed organisms.
The film acknowledges that endocrine disruption is an emerging area of study with much work still to be done.
Household cleaners, paints and stains, furniture, carpets, and many other items contain volatile chemical compounds, which have been linked to cancer, endocrine disruption, and eye irritants.