endocrine disruptor

(redirected from Endocrine disrupting chemicals)

endocrine disruptor

A substance which interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action or elimination of natural hormones in the body that are responsible for development, behaviour, fertility and maintenance of homeostasis (normal cell metabolism).

Examples
DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls, bisphenol A, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, phthalates.

endocrine disruptor

(dĭs-rŭp′tĕr)
A chemical that may imitate or block the function of natural hormones if it is absorbed by the body. Many pesticides and plasticizing compounds, e.g., phthalates, are thought to disrupt endocrine pathways, esp. if they are absorbed by pregnant women during embryonic and fetal development.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Endocrine disrupting chemicals targeting estrogen receptor signaling: identification and mechanisms of action.
All endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have the capacity to stimulate negative effects on the endocrine systems of organisms [11].
Skakkebaek, professor and leader of the Danish team said that for the first time, they showed a direct link between exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals from industrial products and adverse effects on human sperm function.
It belongs to a class of endocrine disrupting chemicals, or EDCs, which have been shown to mimic natural hormones.
The Endocrine Society, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, the European Society of Pediatric Endocrinology and the President's Cancer Panel have all warned about endocrine disruptors -- also referred to as EDCs, for endocrine disrupting chemicals.
The US, Canada, and parts of Europe have banned them in some products for children, but Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) are still to be found in hundreds of thousands of products around the world.
The new report raises the question as to whether endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) - also known as hormone disrupters - could be to blame.
19, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A highly anticipated report released today by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UN Environment Program (UNEP) underlines the urgent need for global action to address the dangers of endocrine disrupting chemicals.
this report reviews the existing knowledge on the analysis, occurrence, treatment, and possible human health and environmental effects of trace endocrine disrupting chemicals from pharmaceuticals and personal care products in water.
Australia has lagged behind Europe and North America in research and policy on endocrine disrupting chemicals in the country's waterways.
Miles-Richardson has served as an agency expert on the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals, providing technical expertise internally and representing the agency on interagency and national committees.
Although limited scientific information is available on the potential adverse human health effects, concern arises because endocrine disrupting chemicals while present in the environment at very low levels, have been shown to have adverse effects in wildlife species, as well as in laboratory animals at these low levels.