emulsion

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Related to Emulsions: Emulsifying agent, Colloids

emulsion

 [e-mul´shun]
a mixture of two immiscible liquids, one being dispersed throughout the other in small droplets; a colloid system in which both the dispersed phase and the dispersion medium are liquids. Margarine, cold cream, and various medicated ointments are emulsions. In some emulsions the suspended particles tend to join together and settle out; hence the container must be shaken each time the emulsion is used.
film emulsion a dehydrated gel emulsion of light- or radiation-sensitive silver halide that is applied to a suitable base.

e·mul·sion

(ē-mŭl'shŭn),
A system containing two immiscible liquids in which one is dispersed, in the form of small globules (internal phase), throughout the other (external phase) (for example, oil in water [milk] or water in oil [mayonnaise]).
[Mod. L. fr. e-mulgeo, pp. -mulsus, to milk or drain out]

emulsion

/emul·sion/ (e-mul´shun) a mixture of two immiscible liquids, one being dispersed throughout the other in small droplets; a colloid system in which both the dispersed phase and the dispersion medium are liquids.

emulsion

[imul′shən]
Etymology: L, emulgere, to milk out
1 a system consisting of two immiscible liquids, one of which is dispersed in the other in the form of small droplets.
2 (in photography) a composition sensitive to actinic rays of light, consisting of one or more silver halides suspended in gelatin applied in a thin layer to film.

emulsion

Pharmacology A suspension of droplets of one liquid in another–eg, oil, water. See Emulsifier.

e·mul·sion

(ē-mŭl'shŭn)
A system containing two immiscible liquids in which one is dispersed, in the form of very small globules (internal phase), throughout the other (external phase).
[Mod. L. fr. e-mulgeo, pp. -mulsus, to milk or drain out]

emulsion

system containing two immiscible liquids, in which one is dispersed as tiny droplets (internal phase) throughout the other (external phase), by addition of an emulsifying agent
  • oil-in-water emulsion water-based emulsion with oil globules suspended in water

  • water-in-oil emulsion oil-based emulsion with water droplets suspended in oil

e·mul·sion

(ē-mŭl'shŭn)
A system containing two immiscible liquids in which one is dispersed, in the form of small globules, throughout the other.
[Mod. L. fr. e-mulgeo, pp. -mulsus, to milk or drain out]

emulsion (ēmul´shən),

n a colloidal dispersion of one liquid in another. See also suspension.
emulsion, digestive,
n the suspension of fat globules, usually in the bile acid of the small intestine, and their resulting breakdown into smaller particles as part of the digestive process. See also emulsifiers.
emulsion, double,
n a suspension of sensitive silver halide salts impregnated in gelatin and coated on both sides of a radiographic film base.
emulsion, silver,
n a suspension of sensitive silver halide salts impregnated in gelatin and used for coating photographic plates and radiographic films.
emulsion, single,
n a suspension of sensitive silver halide salts im-pregnated in gelatin and coated on only one side of a radiographic film base.

emulsion

a mixture of two immiscible liquids, one being dispersed throughout the other in small droplets; a colloid system in which both the dispersed phase and the dispersion medium are liquids. Margarine, cold cream and various medicated ointments are emulsions. In some emulsions the suspended particles tend to join together and settle out; hence the container must be shaken each time the emulsion is used.

x-ray emulsion
radiation-sensitive coating of an x-ray film consisting of a suspension of finely divided grains of silver halide in gelatin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Water-in-oil-in-water (WOW) multiple emulsions have, for many years, been the subject of research in order to utilize their functionality in foods and pharmaceuticals, for reduced fat formulation and taste masking, among other applications.
com has announced the addition of Freedonia Group Inc's new report "World Emulsion Polymers" to their collection of Plastics market reports.
Despite more than two years' effort to develop the product line, we can no longer profitably manufacture, market or sell the emulsions in these regions," said Marc Owens, product manager, liquid inks and additives, North America for Eastman Resins.
The approach we use herein to stabilize emulsions follows closely to the procedure proposed by Liang and Hesp (18).
High demand for emulsion polymers in paints and coatings, led by a rise in building and construction activities, and growth in the automotive industry have been driving the emulsion polymers market since the past few years.
Beta-lactoglobulin-lactoferrin emulsions were unstable to heat at equal to or greater than 60 C.
On the other hand, systems such as VAE emulsions allow the formation of a film at a significantly lower temperature than their [T.
These emulsions are tricky to make and unlike o/w emulsions, almost always require homogenization.
He provides practical information about the formulation, preparation, and characterization of food emulsions, as well as essential knowledge necessary for controlling and improving food emulsion properties.
Its product line includes vinyl acetate homopolymer and ethylene vinyl acetate, acrylic and vinyl acrylic emulsions.
Emulsions also offer low cost, easier handling and clean-up, good adhesion, flexibility and abrasion resistance.
Chapter Titles: Characterization of Oil/Water Interfaces; A Few Examples of the Importance of Phase Diagrams for the Properties and Behaviour of Emulsions; Structure and Stability of Emulsions; Coupling of Coalescence and Flocculation in Dilute O/W Emulsions; Macro-emulsions from the Perspective of Micro-emulsions; Dielectric Spectroscopy on Emulsion and Related Colloidal Systems -- A Review; Electroacoustic Characterization of Emulsions; Acoustic and Electroacoustic Spectroscopy for Characterizing Emulsions and Microemulsions; Food Emulsions