empathy

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empathy

 [em´pah-the]
intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another person's thoughts, feelings, and behavior, even those that are distressing and disturbing. Empathy emphasizes understanding; sympathy emphasizes sharing of another person's feelings and experiences.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē),
1. The ability to sense intellectually and emotionally the emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively. Compare: sympathy (3).
2. The anthropomorphization or humanization of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.
[G. en (em), in, + pathos, feeling]

empathy

/em·pa·thy/ (em´pah-the) intellectual and emotional awareness and understanding of another's thoughts, feelings, and behavior.empath´ic

empathy

(ĕm′pə-thē)
n.
1. The ability to identify with or understand the perspective, experiences, or motivations of another individual or to comprehend and share another individual's emotional state.
2. In aesthetics, the projection of one's own feelings or thoughts on to something else, such as an object in work of art or a character in a novel or film.

empathy

[em′pəthē]
Etymology: Gk, en, in, pathos, feeling
the ability to recognize and to some extent share the emotions and states of mind of another and to understand the meaning and significance of that person's behavior. It is an essential quality for effective psychotherapy. Compare sympathy. empathic, adj., empathize, v.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
1. The ability to sense the emotions, feelings, and reactions intellectually and emotionally that another person is experiencing and to communicate that understanding to the person effectively.
Compare: sympathy (3)
2. The anthropomorphization or humanizing of objects and the feeling of oneself as being in and part of them.

empathy

The state said to exist between two people when one is able to experience the same emotion as the other as a result of identical responses to an event and the adoption of an identical outlook.

em·pa·thy

(em'pă-thē)
Ability to sense intellectually and emotionally emotions, feelings, and reactions that another person is experiencing and it communicate.

empathy,

n the quality of putting oneself into the psychologic frame of reference of another, so that the other person's feeling, thinking, and acting are understood and to some extent predictable. A desirable trust-building characteristic of a helping profession. It is embodied in the sincere statement, “I understand how you feel.” Empathy is different from sympathy in that to be empathetic one understands how the person feels rather than actually experiencing those feelings, as in sympathy.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, you still need the ability to look at this business idea at some emotional distance, the way investors, lenders, employees or potential customers would.
The poem sounds the major themes of epitre 12 -- again, Marguerite is barred from joining her mother and brother because of childbirth (her son Jean of Navarre was born 1530), and again she measures herself against Louise, and finds herself to be the weaker figure, the mortal woman -- but the shift of emphasis, from woeful introspection to a celebration of Louise, reveals the emotional distance traveled by the anguished princess of epitre 12.
According to Smith (1991) and David and Wilson (1992), emotional distance is necessary in bibliotherapy.
It was the effect of this tension that led Pogany as a young and middle-aged man, to begin his dogged attempt to untangle the knot of repressed pain and mutual reproach that continued to keep the brothers at an emotional distance across the chasm of their religious differences.
If framing a narrative allows Mama to gain more control, which also results in her "increasing emotional distance from Dee" (128), we can consider more acutely what is at stake in Dee's emotions, since she feels a need to frame the "story" from the outset.
Audiences are typically males, more aggressive than average, in need of sensory stimulation, in search of social identity or bonding, curious about the forbidden, needing to see justice portrayed or restored, and with an ability to maintain emotional distance from the violence.
His physical and emotional distance from the joyous scene signals his acknowledgement that he has played no part in the paternity of this child.
Directed at a roiling boil by Angela Pope, it's ferociously acted by a first-rate cast, But for all its fireworks, Hollow Reed keeps the viewer at an emotional distance.
The advantage of these techniques is the emotional distance created with fantasy between the client and the problem which allows the client to view the situation more objectively.
Merry's portrait of Stewart's wife, Tish, who responded to her husband's emotional distance and workaholic ways by retiring to her room with her own stiff drink, is poignant but spare.
For instance, 23-year-old women with high self-esteem emphasized the closeness of their social relations, while high self-esteem males at that age stressed keeping emotional distance and control when dealing with others.