Emmonsia

Emmonsia

(e-mon'sē-ă),
A filamentous soil fungus (family Onygenaceae), one species of which (E. parva) occasionally causes pneumonitis in rodents and humans; infection may be particularly severe in immunocompromised hosts.
See also: adiaspiromycosis.

Emmonsia

/Em·mon·sia/ (ĕ-mon´se-ah) a genus of Fungi Imperfecti, soil saprobes; two species, E. cres´cens and E. par´va, cause adiaspiromycosis in rodents and humans.

Emmonsia

a genus of fungi. See chrysosporium.
References in periodicals archive ?
cgi7PAGE_ TYPE=BlastSearch); sequence similarities of 100% and 99%, respectively, were demonstrated for Emmonsia helica strains (including UAMH 3398, UAMH 10539, and UAMH 10593; UAMH Centre for Global Microfungal Biodiversity, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada).
Another fatal case of Emmonsia infection was reported from California in a patient after an orthotopic liver transplant (4).
helica and to clarify the phylogenetic relationships among members of the family Ajellomycetaceae comprising the genera Emmonsia, Blastomyces, Histoplasma and others because recent studies have uncovered far greater complexity than previously supposed (1,6).
50 Years of Emmonsia disease in humans: the dramatic emergence of a cluster of novel fungal pathogens.
In Brazil, similar types of ocular infection were reported as adiaspiromycosis caused by nonbudding, thick-walled adiaconidia of the Emmonsia spp.
Automated laboratory identification systems initially misidentified the Emmonsia sp.
Sequencing of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region of isolates from all 3 patients showed 97%-99% homology with the previously described novel Emmonsia sp.
Amphotericin B will likely remain the optimal empiric induction therapy for suspected cases of disseminated fungal infection among HIV-infected persons in sub-Saharan Africa, given the phylogenetic proximity of Emmonsia spp.
It is most related to the fungal order Onygenales, which includes Emmonsia spp.
Adiaspiromycosis, caused by the fungus Emmonsia sp.
In addition, in 2 biopsy samples, subconjunctival inflammation was present surrounding large, 200-600-micron, thick-walled, spherical foreign bodies (Figure 5) consistent with adiaconidia of Emmonsia sp.
However, the microscopic identification of probable adiaconidia of Emmonsia sp.