Emmonsia

Emmonsia

(e-mon'sē-ă),
A filamentous soil fungus (family Onygenaceae), one species of which (E. parva) occasionally causes pneumonitis in rodents and humans; infection may be particularly severe in immunocompromised hosts.
See also: adiaspiromycosis.

Emmonsia

/Em·mon·sia/ (ĕ-mon´se-ah) a genus of Fungi Imperfecti, soil saprobes; two species, E. cres´cens and E. par´va, cause adiaspiromycosis in rodents and humans.

Emmonsia

a genus of fungi. See chrysosporium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Automated laboratory identification systems initially misidentified the Emmonsia sp.
Sequencing of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region of isolates from all 3 patients showed 97%-99% homology with the previously described novel Emmonsia sp.
Amphotericin B will likely remain the optimal empiric induction therapy for suspected cases of disseminated fungal infection among HIV-infected persons in sub-Saharan Africa, given the phylogenetic proximity of Emmonsia spp.
Although HIV-associated emmonsiosis was suggested to be geographically isolated to the Western Cape Province, South Africa (7), the ecologic niche occupied by this novel Emmonsia sp.
Adiaspiromycosis causing respiratory failure and a review of human infections due to Emmonsia and Chrysosporium spp.
Molecular diagnosis of disseminated adiaspiromycosis due to Emmonsia crescens.
It is most related to the fungal order Onygenales, which includes Emmonsia spp.
Although the thick-walled foreign body we observed microscopically on slides from 2 case-patients was initially suspected to be trematodes, the round, apparently spherical shape, thick walls, and vacuous central area with lack of organized, internal structures is most consistent with the adiaconidia of the Emmonsia sp.
Adiaspiromicose pulmonar (Pneumopatia por Emmonsia crescens).
In addition, in 2 biopsy samples, subconjunctival inflammation was present surrounding large, 200-600-micron, thick-walled, spherical foreign bodies (Figure 5) consistent with adiaconidia of Emmonsia sp.
However, the microscopic identification of probable adiaconidia of Emmonsia sp.
We believe that the clinical improvement of nearly all patients treated with corticosteroids also argues strongly against a bacterial cause or fungal species other than Emmonsia because conidia of Emmonsia sp.