emission

(redirected from Emissions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

emission

 [e-mish´un]
1. a discharge.
2. an involuntary discharge of semen.
nocturnal emission reflex emission of semen during sleep.
thermionic emission the application of heat, such as to a filament, resulting in the emission of electrons and ions.

e·mis·sion

(ē-mish'ŭn),
A discharge; usually referring to a discharge of the male internal genital organs into the internal urethra; the contents of the organs, including sperm cells, prostatic fluid, and seminal vesicle fluid, mix in the internal urethra with mucus from the bulbourethral glands to form semen. Compare: ejaculation.
[L. emissio, fr. e- mitto, to send out]

emission

/emis·sion/ (e-mish´un)
1. discharge (1).
2. an involuntary discharge of semen.

nocturnal emission  reflex emission of semen during sleep.
positron emission  a form of radioactive decay in which a positron (β+) and neutrino are ejected from the nucleus as a proton is transformed into a neutron. Collision of the positron with an electron causes annihilation of both particles and conversion of their masses into energy in the form of two 0.511 MeV gamma rays.

emission

[imish′ən]
Etymology: L, emittere, to send out
a discharge or release of something, as a fluid from the body, electronic signals from a radio transmitter, or an alpha or beta particle from an atomic nucleus during radioactive decay.

emission

The release of a gas, fluid or solid. See Alpha emission Otoacoustic emission.

e·mis·sion

(ē-mish'ŭn)
A discharge; referring usually to a discharge of the male internal genital organs into the internal urethra; the contents of the organs, including sperm cells, prostatic fluid, and seminal vesicle fluid, mix in the internal urethra with mucus from the bulbourethral glands to form semen.
[L. emissio, fr. e-mitto, to send out]

emission

A discharge of something. A nocturnal emission is an involuntary EJACULATION of semen, usually with orgasm, during sleep.

emission

a discharge.
References in periodicals archive ?
on an effective warning system that will alert the driver before the vehicle runs out of AdBlue and result in a potential violation of emission rules.
It would make it very difficult for California to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from cars,'' Sierra Club attorney David Bookbinder said.
Environmental Protection Agency and the European Union (EU) implemented two separate standards--one for on-highway truck engines, another for off-road use--regulating emissions.
This mechanism has the potential to accelerate investment in developing countries sustainably, by encouraging Annex I countries to invest funds in or provide technology transfers for projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Non-Annex I countries.
Emissions from ships engaged in international trade in the seas around Europe--the Baltic, North, Mediterranean, and Black seas, as well as the northeastern Atlantic--were estimated to be 2.
But they argue that the plant's emissions are large only because Bowen generates a huge amount of electricity, almost 21 million megawatt hours in 2004.
As of 2002, Japan's greenhouse gas emissions were 12% over 1990 levels, suggesting that the nation faces a significant challenge in meeting its goal of reducing emissions to 6% below 1990 emission levels in the 2008 to 2012 time frame.
There are more and deadlier gases out there than greenhouse emissions.
As some industry observers note, PZEVs--whose tailpipes are more than 90 percent cleaner than the average 2003 production car, and produce zero evaporative emissions (the vapors that escape from fuel .
The initiative in which 1st Rochdale is participating will focus on homes that are able to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by increasing their energy efficiency.
Thermoforming is said to reduce emissions by enclosing fuel-system components inside the tank.

Full browser ?