physician

(redirected from Emergency physician)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Emergency physician: emergency medicine

physician

 [fĭ-zish´un]
an authorized practitioner of medicine, as one graduated from a college of medicine or osteopathy and licensed by the appropriate board; see also doctor.
attending physician one who attends a hospital at stated times to visit the patients and give directions as to their treatment.
emergency physician a specialist in emergency medicine.
family physician a medical specialist who plans and provides the comprehensive primary health care of all members of a family, regardless of age or sex, on a continuous basis. See also family practice.
resident physician a graduate and licensed physician learning a specialty through in-hospital training.

phy·si·cian

(fi-zish'ŭn),
1. A doctor; a person who has been educated, trained, and licensed to practice the art and science of medicine.
2. A practitioner of medicine, as contrasted with a surgeon.
[Fr. physicien, a natural philosopher]

physician

/phy·si·cian/ (fĭ-zish´in)
1. an authorized practitioner of medicine, as one graduated from a college of medicine or osteopathy and licensed by the appropriate board; see also doctor.
2. one who practices medicine as distinct from surgery.

physician assistant  one who has been trained in an accredited program and certified by an appropriate board to perform certain of a physician's duties, including history taking, physical examination, diagnostic tests, treatment, and certain minor surgical procedures, all under the responsible supervision of a licensed physician. Abbreviated P.A.
attending physician 
1. a physician who has admitting privileges at a hospital.
2. the physician with primary responsibility for the care of a patient in a particular case.
emergency physician  a specialist in emergency medicine.
family physician  a medical specialist who plans and provides the comprehensive primary health care of all members of a family, regardless of age or sex, on a continuous basis.
resident physician  a graduate and licensed physician receiving training in a specialty, usually in a hospital.

physician

(fĭ-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. A person trained and licensed to practice medicine; a medical doctor.
2. A person who heals or exerts a healing influence.

physician

[fizish′ən]
Etymology: Gk, physikos, natural
a health professional who has earned a degree of Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) after completing an approved course of study at an approved medical school. Satisfactory completion of National Board Examinations, usually given during both the second and the final years of medical school and after graduation, is also required. An M.D. or D.O. usually enters a hospital internship or residency program for at least 2 years of postgraduate training before beginning practice or further training in a specialty. To practice medicine, an M.D. or D.O. is required to obtain a license from the state in which professional services will be performed. See also osteopath.

physician

A person who has received the degree of doctor of medicine (M.D.) or doctor of osteopathy (D.O.) following completion of a prescribed course of study in medicine and surgery in an accredited medical school, or study in osteopathy in an accredited osteopathic school, respectively, and who, following a period of internship or residency, is licensed to practise medicine and surgery in a particular state or states.

physician

Medtalk A person trained, qualified, and licensed to practice medicine, osteopathy or dentistry. See Admitting physician, Attending physician, Chest physician, Complementary physician, Corroborating physician, Covering physician, Doctor of osteopathy, Exempt physician, Family physician, Fellow, High-cost physician, Hospital-based physician, Intern, House physician, Low cost physician, Medical doctor, Panel physician, Personal physician, Primary care physician, Rent-a-doc, Resident, Sentinel physician, Supervising physician, Surgeon, Teaching physician, Triple threat physician, Virtual physician.

phy·si·cian

(fi-zish'ŭn)
1. A doctor; a person who has been educated, trained, and licensed to practice the art and science of medicine.
2. A practitioner of medicine, as contrasted with a surgeon.
[Fr. physicien, a natural philosopher]

physician

1. A person qualified and licensed to practice medicine.
2. A doctor specializing in a medical, as distinct from a surgical, speciality.

phy·si·cian

(fi-zish'ŭn)
A doctor; a person who has been educated, trained, and licensed to practice the art and science of medicine.
[Fr. physicien, a natural philosopher]

physician,

n a practitioner of medicine; one lawfully engaged in the practice of medicine.

physician

a veterinarian who devotes him or herself to work with medical rather than surgical or reproductive diseases.

Patient discussion about physician

Q. What is a physician assistant? What are the differences betwwen it and MD? My son want to be a doctor (MD). I think it might be to hard for him. I know that there is something called physician assistant can someone elaborate more about this profession?

A. physician assistant are just like full doctors except they need a MD to sign some of the forms they have.
You can see more about the academic program here
http://paprogram.mc.duke.edu/

Q. How can I know that my doctor is good? You must check and test your doctor. How do i check or test my doctor? I will tell you here...

A. so doctor, what do you recommend me to do. which choices do i have? hm, what i know is, that if you continue straight away we will crash in this ice-berg. you as captian, you will have to sink with your boat, because this is a question of your honour. me as your doctor i will look that i can take an emergency boat to save my life and help somebody else. so doctor, what can we do. your doctor can then say: you have to make a maneuvre. you can't for sure go on like this on you way (life/habit). so he/she should be able to explain you how to deal with the engines, the sails, whatever to avoid the crash. if he/she has no idea, change your doctor, if he/she tells you to need more help about it, find out together, he/she is at least honest - so give her/him a chance to grow with you. i have the hope that i could reach you with these explanations.

Q. Doctor with cancer Hi, My dad, 78 years old former doctor was diagnosed with lung cancer after he had suspicion about it for some time. According to the surgeon it’s stage I so the operation has good chance to succeed. However, my dad is always worried about the future- because he knows about this disease, he’s very afraid about things like pain and disability that may come in the future. It’s like for him the knowledge is a curse. Anyone else in the same situation?

A. HI; your father knows what the out comes of these operations are because he is a DR,I have asthma, whenever i get a cold or an attack, i allways think of the worst of having this disease--because i am also a respiratory therapist--it is normal for your father to feel like this--mrfoot56

More discussions about physician
References in periodicals archive ?
Ironically, emergency physicians in SA already have policies and recommendations in place for these issues, (1-5) but are unlikely to see them enforced in departments that are not covered by emergency physicians.
Emergency Medical Associates (EMA) is a premier, democratically-governed emergency physician group, which has been providing state-of-the-art emergency care for over 28 years and ensuring the highest levels of clinical excellence and patient satisfaction.
At Idaho Emergency Physicians (IEP), we perform work on shifts that are scheduled in a geometric progression through the month such that any one individual is always passing the same individuals on changes of shift.
This survey was conducted online in the United States by Marketing General Incorporated on behalf of the American College of Emergency Physicians between March 16-23, 2015, among 2,099 emergency physicians age 18 or older, providing a response rate of 9 percent and a margin of error of 2.
When DeKalb Medical Center desired to transition the current emergency department physicians from employees managed by the hospital to an independent physician group, the California Emergency Physicians Medical Group (CEP) practice model was selected as the basis of a new physician group.
27, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) today announced it has been working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Emergency Nurses Association to establish procedures to help emergency personnel evaluate and manage emergency patients suspected of possible Ebola infection.
In a recent poll, seven in 10 emergency physicians responding to a poll reported seeing patients with health insurance who delayed medical care because of high out-of-pocket expenses, high deductibles or high co-insurance.
Emergency physicians have been receiving advanced training through critical care fellowships since the late 1980s, but there was never a pathway to board certification, Dr.
Kolodzik is a Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
The survey, commissioned last month by TeleTracking Technologies and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), reports more than 80 percent of respondents say overcrowding is one of their top five management concerns.
27, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) today announced that Jay Kaplan, MD, FACEP, from San Anselmo, CA, assumed the presidency during the organization's annual meeting in Boston.
com) founded in 1983, provides comprehensive billing services for hospital-based emergency physicians setting the standard for customer service, information, management reporting, technology and overall performance.

Full browser ?