Elizabethan collar

(redirected from Elizabethan collars)

Elizabethan collar

a rigid material fashioned so as to project outward from around the neck of a dog or cat and prevent the mouth or teeth from damaging skin, casts or dressings on the legs or body. X-ray film or heavy plastic sheeting are usually used for this purpose. Also used in birds.
Enlarge picture
Elizabethan collar. By permission from Nelson RW, Couto CG, Small Animal Internal Medicine, Mosby, 2003

reversed Elizabethan collar
in birds, reversing the collar permits better movement and is better tolerated.
Elizabethan collar test
improvement of alopecia or traumatic skin lesions after placement of an Elizabethan collar for a short period of time will identify the cause as self trauma or excessive grooming.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Some other tools you can use to protect yourself from a cat's teeth include cat muzzles, Elizabethan collars, and thick leather gloves.
Elizabethan collars, affectionately known as the "cone of shame," leave your cat's face totally exposed but limit her range to bite.
Recovery collars were formerly referred to as Elizabethan collars, the name inspired by the popular neckline ruffs worn by people during the Elizabethan era, the epoch in English history marked by the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558-1603).
The term Elizabethan collar is still heard frequently, but because it tends to be shortened to e-collar and because that's also a shortened version of electronic collar, the phrase is falling out of use for this application.
For whatever reason, many veterinarians sell Elizabethan collars that are made of very stiff, hard, and opaque plastic.
Every dog owner should be aware that, today, there are a number of alternatives to the classic Elizabethan collars to prevent a dog from licking a wound, aggravating a hot spot, tearing out his surgical stitches, or removing a bandage.
The dog was so leggy that he actually could wear the Elizabethan collar either way; wearing a conventional "cone" like a "prince" would render dogs with shorter legs immobile.

Full browser ?