Socratic method

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A teaching philosophy that differs from the traditional format as instruction takes the form of problem-solving and testing of hypotheses

Socratic method

Education A teaching philosophy that differs from the traditional format as instruction is in the form of problem-solving and testing of hypotheses. See Layer cake education, Spoon feeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
This passage is important to Vlastos, for he takes it to supply evidence of a new Plato, one who got his start in Meno with a praise of geometry, and who then rejected the moral and elenctic philosophizing of the historical Socrates.
The introduction of the hypothetical method at Meno 86e1-87b2 has often been taken to be a qualitative departure from the elenctic method.
This notion of the Socratic project and of Socrates' elenctic activity, however, is difficult to reconcile with Xenophon's claim that the question "what is madness" ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) was central to Socrates' concerns.
I believe that madness, and in particular the distinction between divine madness and human madness adduced by Socrates in the Phaedrus, is of central significance to our understanding of Socratic philosophy and Socratic elenctic method even, or especially, in those dialogues which seem to lack any reference to the notion of divine forms of madness.
Socrates' elenctic refutations are necessary first steps, therefore, in his attempt to engage others in a search for true wisdom.
It should not be treated simply as "an edifying curtain-raiser to the elenctic drama it precedes.
Although the categorization of the Parmenides as late or coming "at the peak" of the Platonic dialogues along with the Timaeus can be traced back to the Academy in the sequence associated with Iamblichus, Friedreich Schleiermacher argued that it was a relatively early elenctic and "aporetic" dialogue which ought to be grouped with the Protagoras.
22) Furthermore, it is of course not only perfectly consistent with this idea, but evidence in its support, that only in the Gorgias does Plato have Socrates, for the first time, commit himself to the truth of the results of elenctic investigation (486e5-6; cf.