Socratic method

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A teaching philosophy that differs from the traditional format as instruction takes the form of problem-solving and testing of hypotheses

Socratic method

Education A teaching philosophy that differs from the traditional format as instruction is in the form of problem-solving and testing of hypotheses. See Layer cake education, Spoon feeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
This notion of the Socratic project and of Socrates' elenctic activity, however, is difficult to reconcile with Xenophon's claim that the question "what is madness" ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) was central to Socrates' concerns.
I believe that madness, and in particular the distinction between divine madness and human madness adduced by Socrates in the Phaedrus, is of central significance to our understanding of Socratic philosophy and Socratic elenctic method even, or especially, in those dialogues which seem to lack any reference to the notion of divine forms of madness.
22) Furthermore, it is of course not only perfectly consistent with this idea, but evidence in its support, that only in the Gorgias does Plato have Socrates, for the first time, commit himself to the truth of the results of elenctic investigation (486e5-6; cf.
26) There is very little evidence for thinking that this notion constituted an idea disseminated widely enough--or, for that matter, articulated sufficiently--by Socrates' time (or even by the time of Plato's early works) to provide a sensible term of contrast with Socrates' elenctic method of dialectic.
But in the sense which he would give to "teaching"--engaging would-be learners in elenctic argument to make them aware of their own ignorance and enable them to discover for themselves the truth the teacher had held back--in that sense of "teaching" Socrates would want to say that he is a teacher, the only true teacher: his dialogue with his fellows is meant to have, and does have, the effect of evoking and assisting their efforts at moral self-improvement.
One possible answer to this question would be that these dialogues depict Socrates at the early stage of his elenctic career, before the incidents described in the Apology occur.