electron

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Related to Electron mass: speed of light, Planck constant, Joule, Bohr radius

electron

 [e-lek´tron]
any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbitals around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they are beta particles.ƒ

The number of electrons revolving around the nucleus of an atom is equal to its atomic number. An atom of oxygen, for instance, which has an atomic number of 8, has eight electrons in orbit around the nucleus in a manner similar to the planets revolving around the sun in our solar system.

Electrons greatly influence the behavior of an atom toward other atoms. The combination of various elements to form compounds is brought about by the losing or gaining of electrons; the process is sometimes called “sharing” of electrons. For example, the combination of the elements sodium and chlorine produce the compound sodium chloride (table salt). This is accomplished by the transfer of one electron from the outer electron shell of the sodium atom to the outer electron shell of the chlorine atom. This combining of elements by the loss or gain of electrons is called electrovalence.

e·lec·tron (β-),

(ē-lek'tron),
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called β particles. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
See also: shell.
[electro- + -on]

electron

/elec·tron/ (e-lek´tron) an elementary particle with the unit quantum of (negative) charge, constituting the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity.electron´ic

electron

[ilek′tron]
Etymology: Gk, elektron, amber
1 a negatively charged elementary particle that has a specific charge, mass, and spin. The number of electrons associated with the nucleus of an atom is equal to the atomic number of the substance.
2 a negative beta particle emitted from a radioactive substance. See also atom, element, ion, neutron, proton.

e·lec·tron

(β-) (ĕ-lek'tron)
One of the negatively charged subatomic particles that are distributed about the positive nucleus and with it constitute the atom; in mass they are estimated to be 1/1836.15 of a proton; when emitted from inside the nucleus of a radioactive substance, electrons are called beta particles.
[electro- + -on]

Electron

One of the small particles that make up an atom. An electron has the same mass and amount of charge as a positron, but the electron has a negative charge.

electron (i·lekˑ·trn),

n the negatively charged particle that orbits around the nucleus of an atom.

e·lec·tron

(ĕ-lek'tron)
Negatively charged subatomic particles that orbit the positive nucleus, in one of several energy levels called shells. A nucleus and its electrons constitute an atom.
[electro- + -on]

electron (e) (ēlek´tron),

n a negatively charged elementary particle constituent in every neutral atom, with a mass of 0.000549. (Particles with an equal but opposite charge are called
positrons.)
electron beam,
n See electron stream.
electron stream,
n (electron beam, cathode ray, cathode stream), a stream of electrons emitted from the negative electrode (cathode) in a roentgen-ray tube; their bombardment of the anode gives rise to the roentgen rays.

electron

any of the negatively charged particles arranged in orbits around the nucleus of an atom and determining all of the atom's physical and chemical properties except mass and radioactivity. Electrons flowing in a conductor constitute an electric current; when ejected from a radioactive substance, they constitute the beta particles.

electron acceptor
see oxidant.
electron beam
the stream of electrons that flows from the anode to the cathode in the x-ray tube and then interacts with the tungsten target to produce x-rays.
electron carrier
a molecule associated with membrane-bound proteins that accepts and transfers electrons.
electron donor
electron micrographs
photographic images of electron microscopic fields.
electron microscope
see electron microscope.
electron microscopy
technology of using an electron microscope.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the essential theoretical background and fundamental principles, this unique reference presents a detailed, step-by-step methodology for interpreting even electron mass spectrometry results.
4] e+1, 9] Table 12: List of the 10 possible continued fraction representations of the electron mass when considering the rules that denominators must be small and their sum including the free link equals zero, together with their associate phase shifts and the number of outliers when considering the following set of 18 particles: [[mu].
The expression m[upsilon][lambda] = h used in (1) to arrive at the total electron kinetic energy is the de Broglie relation expressed in simple, physically intuitive terms: the de Broglie relation yields the product of the electron mass m, its average velocity [upsilon], and the path length [lambda] over which its instantaneous velocity varies.
zp] generates the electron mass in (9), thereby creating the point electron characterized by its bare point charge [e.
Nowadays proton to electron mass ratio is known with much greater precision: [mu] = [m.
Washington, Jan 10 ( ANI ): A research done by University of Arizona astronomy professor found that a popular alternative to Albert Einstein's theory for the acceleration of the expansion of the universe does not fit newly obtained data on a fundamental constant, the proton to electron mass ratio.
3] layers, the magnetic order was suppressed and the effective electron mass was further enhanced.
Liu, Towards an electronic kilogram: an improved measurement of the Planck constant and electron mass, Metrologia 42, 431-441 (2005).
Dionex has been selling its IC systems coupled with a Thermo Electron mass selective detector and, last year, Agilent and Metrohm developed a method combining the Metrohm IC and the Agilent 1100 Series mass selective detector.