official

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official

 [ŏ-fĭ´shal]
authorized by pharmacopeias and recognized formularies.

of·fi·cial

(ŏ-fi'shăl),
Authoritative; denoting a drug or a chemical or pharmaceutical preparation recognized as standard in the pharmacopeia. Compare: officinal.
[L. officialis, fr. officium, a favor, service, fr. opus, work, + facio, to do]

official

/of·fi·cial/ (o-fĭ´shal) authorized by a current pharmacopeia or recognized formulary.

official

(ə-fĭsh′əl)
adj.
Authorized by or contained in the US Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary. Used of drugs.

of·fi′cial·dom n.
of·fi′cial·ly adv.

of·fi·cial

(ŏ-fish'ăl)
Authoritative; denoting a drug, a chemical, or a pharmaceutical preparation recognized as standard in the Pharmacopeia.
[L. officialis, fr. officium, a favor, service, fr. opus, work, + facio, to do]
References in periodicals archive ?
If it's on, your elected officials (and everyone else on Facebook) will be able to see that you live within the district or area that they represent indicated with the badge next to any comments you make on their posts.
An individual who helps influence the policy process at the local, state and federal levels by developing relationships with elected officials
It would apply to local elected officials and members of the State Board of Education.
This is shameful of any elected official currently in Washington.
In rejecting the pay increases, the commissioners followed the recommendation of the county budget committee, which also advised against raises for elected officials.
Elected officials are tapped into the pulse of the community and can engage constituents and rally support, however they often must take positions on political issues and often do not know or are not connected with the economic development process, on the other hand, staff have historical knowledge and critical data and information.
Whether meeting with a staff member or an elected official, Vance had the following tips for CMRA members listening to her presentation: Know your facts, be positive, be specific and don't turn the meeting into a monolog or long complaint.
In 1964, there were only 300 black elected officials nationwide and just three African Americans in the Congress.
Other gay elected officials who are in the closet should aim to do the same.
With state legislators, members of Congress and other elected officials competing to see who can appear the most pious, the following editorial from The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is timely.