Eisenmenger syndrome

Ei·sen·men·ger syn·drome

(ī'zĕn-men-gĕr),
cardiac failure with significant right-to-left shunt producing cyanosis due to higher pressure on the right side of the shunt. Usually due to the Eisenmenger complex, a ventricular septal defect with right ventricular hypertrophy and dilatation, severe pulmonary hypertension, and frequent straddling of the defect by a misplaced aortic root.

Ei·sen·men·ger syn·drome

(ī'zĕn-meng'ĕr sin'drōm)
Cardiac failure with significant right-to-left shunt producing cyanosis due to higher pressure on the right side of the shunt.

Eisenmenger syndrome

A congenital heart anomaly featuring a ‘hole in the heart’ (septal defect) or an unclosed DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS associated with serious changes in the lung blood vessels causing increased resistance to the passage of blood. Early surgical treatment of heart holes or patent ductus arteriosus may prevent the secondary lung changes from developing. (Victor Eisenmenger, 1864–1932, German physician).

Eisenmenger,

Victor, German physician, 1864-1932.
Eisenmenger complex - the combination of ventricular septal defect with pulmonary hypertension and consequent right-to-left shunt through the defect, with or without an associated overriding aorta. Synonym(s): Eisenmenger defect; Eisenmenger disease; Eisenmenger tetralogy
Eisenmenger defect - Synonym(s): Eisenmenger complex
Eisenmenger disease - Synonym(s): Eisenmenger complex
Eisenmenger syndrome - cardiac failure usually due to the Eisenmenger complex, a ventricular septal defect.
Eisenmenger tetralogy - Synonym(s): Eisenmenger complex

Eisenmenger

German physician (1864-1932).

Eisenmenger complex
interventricular septal defect.
Eisenmenger syndrome
the clinical syndrome caused by the Eisenmenger complex, a ventricular septal defect with pulmonary hypertension and cyanosis due to right-to-left (reversed) shunt of blood. Sometimes defined as pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary vascular disease) and cyanosis with the shunt being at the atrial, ventricular, or great vessel area. Characterized by exercise intolerance, cyanosis, anasarca, palpable thrill and auscultatable cardiac murmur.
References in periodicals archive ?
Should the disease progress without any medical or surgical intervention, the left-to-right shunt could convert into a right-to-left one, namely Eisenmenger syndrome.
Switzerland-based Actelion has failed to meet its primary goal in a Phase III study assessing the company's macitentan in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) due to Eisenmenger Syndrome, it was reported yesterday.
Hassager, "Pulmonary artery dissection in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome treated with heart and lung transplantation," European Journal of Echocardiography, vol.
6) Both a 22-year old man who received anesthesia for a repeated craniotomy to repair a chronic brain abscess and a 50-year-old woman anesthetized for emergency laparotomy presented with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease, further complicated by the presence of Eisenmenger syndrome.
Pulmonary thrombosis in adults with Eisenmenger syndrome.
Further evidence of the benefits of pulmonary vasodilators in Eisenmenger syndrome was provided in a prospective openlabel study of sildenafil in 84 patients (45).
In certain conditions that would benefit from heart and lung transplantation however, such as Eisenmenger syndrome, idiopathic pulmonary hypertension and extreme pulmonary atresia, the retention of one relatively 'healthy' lung may be beneficial.
The 23-year-old was diagnosed with Eisenmenger syndrome at birth, meaning he has a hole between the two pumping chambers of the heart.
Patients particularly sensitive to shifts in blood volume as those with severe pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome may experience considerable morbidity and mortality during this period.
Mrs Taylor, who lives in the Stapleton area of Bristol, was born with a rare degenerative heart condition, Eisenmenger Syndrome, which is now known as Grown-up Congenital Heart (GUCH).
However, there are other, less common cardiac conditions associated with syncope and sudden death, such as Eisenmenger syndrome, congenital heart block, and Marfan's syndrome.
Mrs Smith, from Nailsworth near Stroud in Gloucestershire, developed Eisenmenger syndrome, in which pressure builds up in the right hand side of the heart.