yolk

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yolk

 [yōk]
the stored nutrient of the ovum.

yolk

(yōk, yōlk),
1. One of the types of nutritive material stored in the oocyte (ovum) for the nutrition of the embryo; yolk is particularly abundant and conspicuous in the eggs of birds. Synonym(s): vitellus
2. Fatty material found in the wool of sheep; when extracted and purified, it becomes lanolin.
[A.S. geolca; geolu, yellow]

yolk

(yōk) the stored nutrient of an oocyte or ovum.

yolk

(yōk)
n.
1.
a. The portion of the egg of egg-laying vertebrates, such as reptiles and birds, and of certain invertebrates that consists chiefly of protein and fat and serves as the primary source of nourishment for the early embryo.
b. This portion of the egg of a bird, especially a chicken, which is large, yellow, and surrounded by albumen.
2. A greasy substance found in unprocessed sheep's wool, which is refined to make lanolin.

yolk′y adj.

yolk

[yōk, yelk]
Etymology: AS, geolca
a material rich in fats and proteins that is contained in an ovum and that supplies nourishment to the developing embryo. The amount and distribution of the yolk within the ovum depend on the species of animal and the type of reproduction and development of offspring. In humans and most other mammals, yolk is absent or greatly diffused through the ovum. Mammalian embryos absorb nutrients directly from the mother through the placenta. Also called vitellus. See also deutoplasm.

yolk

(yōk)
1. One of the types of nutritive material stored in the oocyte for the nutrition of the embryo; particularly abundant and conspicuous in the eggs of birds.
Synonym(s): vitellus.
2. Fatty material found in the wool of sheep; when extracted and purified, it becomes lanolin.
[A.S. geolca;geolu, yellow]

yolk

the food store in the eggs of the majority of animals, made up mainly of fat and protein granules. It must contain all the essential ingredients for the entire development of the embryo. Where yolk is present in the egg, as in chickens, there is meroblastic CLEAVAGE, but where it is absent, or nearly so, cleavage is holoblastic, as in Amphioxus. Yolk is almost absent from mammal eggs, since food is provided directly from the mother, via the PLACENTA.

yolk

(yōk)
One of the types of nutritive material stored in the oocyte (ovum) for the nutrition of the embryo; particularly abundant and conspicuous in birds' eggs.
[A.S. geolca;geolu, yellow]

yolk

1. the stored nutrient of the ovum; it is also rich in antibody which is absorbed into the circulation of the embryo in the last third of incubation and is the mechanism by which maternal antibody is transferred to the young bird. See also yolk sac, egg.
2. the combined secretion of the sebaceous and sudoriferous glands of the sheep's skin and extractable from the fleece.

yolk sacculitis
see avian omphalitis.
yolk stalk
the connection, passing through the umbilicus, between the yolk sac and the fetus.
yolk stain
a stain of wool originating from the yolk.
References in periodicals archive ?
The AMA's advice: Eat no more than four egg yolks a week (egg whites are cholesterol-free).
Philadelphia style is made without eggs, and French (or custard) has a custard base of egg yolks cooked with milk and cream.
Gently spoon a quarter of the dried fig paste along the centre of each of the pastry pieces, and brush one side with a little beaten egg yolk and milk.
Although chickens infected with Salmonella do not deposit the pathogen inside the egg yolk very often, bacteria from the surrounding albumen might penetrate through the membrane that surrounds the yolk.
As the egg yolks developed into chicken embryos, they fed on the egg whites, even though the egg whites were from a different species.
Whisking constantly, add the hot cream mixture to the whisked egg yolks.
Surveying more than 1200 patients, Spence found regular consumption of egg yolks is about two-thirds as bad as smoking when it comes to increased build-up of carotid plaque, a risk factor for stroke and heart attack.
David Spence of Western University, Canada, and his team surveyed more than 1200 patients and found that regular consumption of egg yolks is about two-thirds as bad as smoking when it comes to increased build-up of carotid plaque, a risk factor for stroke and heart attack.
Whisk the egg yolks with 80g sugar until it becomes pale and creamy and set to one side.
It is shown that feeding the omega-3 fatty acid-rich flax oil and omega-6 fatty acid-rich soybean oil is in higher omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids values in egg yolks [14].
3) Once the milk and cream are hot, pour them into the egg yolks and stir.