effector

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effector

 [ef-fek´ter]
1. an agent that mediates a specific effect, as an allosteric effector or an effector cell.
2. an organ that produces an effect, such as contraction or secretion, in response to nerve stimulation; see also receptor.
allosteric effector one that binds to an enzyme at a site other than the active site.

ef·fec·tor

(ē-fek'tŏr, -tōr),
1. As defined by Sherrington, a peripheral tissue that receives nerve impulses and reacts by muscular contractioon, glandular secretion, or electric discharge (from an electric organ, as in the case of certain bony fishes such as the electric eel).
2. A small metabolic molecule that, by combining with a repressor gene, depresses the activity of an operon.
3. A small molecule that binds to a protein or other macromolecule and, in so doing, alters the activity of that macromolecule.
4. An individual or a substance, technique, procedure, or person causing an effect.
[L. producer]

effector

/ef·fec·tor/ (ĕ-fek´ter)
1. an agent that mediates a specific effect.
2. an organ that produces an effect in response to nerve stimulation.

allosteric effector  an enzyme inhibitor or activator that has its effect at a site other than the catalytic site of the enzyme.

effector

(ĭ-fĕk′tər)
n.
1. A muscle, gland, or organ capable of responding to a stimulus, especially a nerve impulse.
2. A nerve ending that carries impulses to a muscle, gland, or organ and activates muscle contraction or glandular secretion.
3. Biochemistry A small molecule or protein that alters biochemical processes in a cell, as by decreasing or increasing the activity of an enzyme.

effector

[ifek′tər]
Etymology: L, efficere, to accomplish
1 an organ that produces an effect, such as glandular secretion, as a result of nerve stimulation.
2 a molecule, such as an enzyme, that can start or stop a chemical reaction.

effector

An organ, such as a gland or muscle, that responds to a motor stimulation. See Allosteric effector.

ef·fec·tor

(e-fek'tŏr)
1. A peripheral tissue that receives nerve impulses and reacts by contraction (muscle), secretion (gland), or a discharge of electricity (electric organ of certain bony fishes).
2. A small metabolic molecule that, by combining with a repressor gene, depresses the activity of an operon.
3. A small molecule that binds to a protein and, in so doing, alters the activity of that protein.
4. A substance, technique, procedure, or individual that causes an effect.
[L. producer]

effector

a structure or organ that brings about an action of'effect’ as a result of a stimulus received through a RECEPTOR which can come from the CNS or from a hormone. The effector is usually a muscle but can be a gland.

effector

tissue (e.g. a muscle or gland) receiving nerve impulses and reacting by contraction or secretion

ef·fec·tor

(e-fek'tŏr)
1. Peripheral tissue that receives nerve impulses and reacts by muscular contraction, glandular secretion, or electric discharge (from an electric organ, as in the case of certain bony fishes such as the electric eel).
2. Small metabolic molecule that, by combining with a repressor gene, depresses the operon activity.
[L. producer]

effector (ēfek´tur),

n 1. a motor or secretory nerve ending in an organ, gland, or muscle; consequently called an
effector organ. n 2. an on-the-job organ of the body that responds to stimulations asking for corrections. Antonym: receptor.

effector

1. a muscle or gland that contracts or secretes, respectively, in direct response to nerve impulses.
2. a molecule that binds to an enzyme with an effect on its catalytic activity, i.e. either an activator or inhibitor.

allosteric effector
one that binds to an enzyme at a site other than the active site.
effector cell
cell in the immune system that mediates an immune function.
References in periodicals archive ?
We will also create and test derivatives of RPS4/RRS1 or related complexes that are designed to respond to effectors that target other host protein domains.
End effectors are the functional units attached to the end of a robot arm that perform specific production or logistical tasks.
The aim of this short chapter is just to remind all of us that without the proper brain and computer work done at the numerous joint cells that deal with the aforementioned tasks, target acquisition assets as well as effectors suddenly become useless, at least among developed armies.
Our study identifies a bacterial effector that creates gated ion channels and reveals a novel mechanism that may regulate autophagy," explains corresponding author Kim Orth, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry.
50] ~ 200 nM), but would have little or no effect on lower affinity effectors including CNG channels and EPAC (E[C.
These TAL effectors nucleases (TALENs) can be used to add or remove specific genes or correct gene mutations-techniques that fall under the broad category of genome editing.
to verify the solutions for bases and effectors through the inverse structural model characterized by a zero instantaneous degree of mobility;
Distinguishing among effectors, systems, and platforms allows greater flexibility and certainly better adaptability.
TAL effectors were originally discovered in bacteria that infect plants, where they target specific DNA sequences in the plant genome, rewiring gene expression to establish and propagate infection.
The todays trend in the field of end effector exchange is the automated exchange systems (Danisova et al.
It is unclear, however, whether PRN also adversely affects cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), the primary (1[degrees]) effectors of cell-mediated immunity.
As part of the four-month, $419-million upgrade plan (the last Dodge Neon rolled off the assembly line in September 2005), Chrysler gutted the body shop and installed more than 780 new ABB robots that are fitted with quick-change end effectors, not the typical dedicated tooling often found in assembly plants.