calmodulin

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calmodulin

 [kal-mod´u-lin]
a calcium-binding protein present in all nucleated cells, thought to be an essential mediator of most calcium-sensitive cellular processes.

cal·mod·u·lin

(kal-mod'ū-lin),
A small, ubiquitous eukaryotic protein that binds calcium ions, thereby becoming the agent for many of the cellular effects long ascribed to calcium ions. This calcium-protein complex binds to the apoenzyme, to form the holoenzyme, of certain phosphodiesterases; through these mechanisms, the complex regulates adenylate and guanylate cyclases, many kinases, phospholipase A2 activity, and other basic cellular functions.
[calcium + modulate]

calmodulin

/cal·mod·u·lin/ (kal-mod´u-lin) a calcium-binding protein present in all nucleated cells; it mediates a variety of cellular reponses to calcium.

calmodulin

(kăl-mŏj′ə-lĭn)
n.
A calcium-binding protein that mediates many metabolic processes, such as contraction of smooth muscle, by binding to enzymes and other proteins.

calmodulin

[kalmod′yəlin]
a calcium-binding protein that mediates a variety of biochemical and physiological processes, including the contraction of smooth muscles and the release of norepinephrine. Calmodulin may act independently of, in concert with, or antagonistically to reactions involving cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

cal·mod·u·lin

(kal-mod'yū-lin)
A protein that binds calcium ions, thereby becoming the agent for many of the cellular effects long ascribed to calcium ions.
[calcium + modulate]

cal·mod·u·lin

(kal-mod'yū-lin)
Protein that binds calcium ions.
[calcium + modulate]

calmodulin (kalmoj´əlin),

n a calcium-binding protein that mediates a variety of biochemical and physiologic processes, including the contraction of muscles and the release of norepinephrine.

calmodulin

a calcium-binding protein concerned in the response of muscle fibers and other cells to calcium.
References in periodicals archive ?
If we compare these modifications with another protein that has an EF hand motif present in polar fish parvalbumins, these amino acid substitutions are not implicated directly in the calcium-binding activity.