gibbon

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gib·bon

(gib'on),
A genus of anthropoid apes, Hylobates, of the superfamily Hominoidea.
[Fr.]

gibbon

a long-armed anthropoid ape of the genus Hylobatea.

gibbon

slender, tailless, noisy, arboreal ape, about 3 ft high and weighing about 15 lb. The least anthropoid of the anthropoid apes, in the family Pongidae. Called also Hylobates spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not surprising that Cicero, Quintillian, and Plutarch among the ancients, and Edward Gibbon among the moderns, found such profit in his works, for Xenophon is a daring rhetorician and a brilliant exponent of Socratic method.
From Machiavelli to Edward Gibbon the historian saw his job as doing some service to the state and drawing on history (and sometimes a lucrative salary) to offer useful advice.
grounds his arguments in an intense analysis of a number of major texts that influenced Edward Gibbon in his 1776-88 Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.
Finally, no discussion of Roman sources would be complete without reference to the venerable Edward Gibbon, whose massive History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire remains, more than two centuries after its original publication, the most comprehensive such history, and perhaps the greatest historical treatise on any subject ever written.
Edward Gibbon triumphantly combined classical rhetorical eloquence and antiquarian rigour in his Decline and Fall--the first and last to do so.
In this collection of eight articles, contributors describe aspects of that growth in such topics as the models of Christian expansion, Christian ideology as a source of growth, the role of women, the significance of leadership and organization, the impact of the barbarians, the competition with pagan and polytheist practice, and the influence of the followers of Edward Gibbon in historiography.
The Grand Tour changed its focus as fashion and political expediency dictated, but in the last few decades of the eighteenth century, primed by the writings of men such as Edward Gibbon and Constantin-Francois Volney, travellers' concerns were increasingly directed towards the fate of great empires.
His purview includes well-known works of "philosophical" history, such as David Hume's History of England (though Edward Gibbon is given short shrift) as well as lesser-known works, such as Helen Maria Williams's Letters Written in France, in the Summer of 1790, to a Friend in England.
Influenced by Geoffrey Parker and by Edward Gibbon, Black is convinced that a combination of military, economic, political, and cultural factors have been responsible for change.
Edward Gibbon Wakefield, an aristocrat from Macclesfield, not only plotted to kidnap Ellen Turner from her Liverpool school, but whisked her away across the Scottish border.