Wilson

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Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
Clifford, English physician, 1906-1997. See: Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
James, English anatomist, physiologist, and surgeon, 1765-1821. See: Wilson muscle.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
Miriam G., 20th-century U.S. pediatrician. See: Wilson-Mikity syndrome.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
Samuel A. Kinnier, English neurologist, 1878-1937. See: Wilson disease.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
William J.E., English dermatologist, 1809-1884. See: Wilson disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Literary Essays and Reviews of the 1930s & 40s, by Edmund Wilson.
Her sassy and learned letters to Theodore Roethke ("twenty-six years old, and a frightful tank" she called him during their brief, uproarious affair) and Edmund Wilson ("my charming old syringa") are the best of the bunch.
And although Edmund Wilson had already been hard at work for close to half a century by then, there was something about the vehemence of his writing, a quality of opinions with an authority at once daringly personal and astonishingly grand, that fit right in with a period when intellectual debate had a boisterous ferocity.
But Edmund Wilson, one of the major fans of Waugh's comic novels, dismissed Brideshead as a "religious tract," though that may have been in response to Waugh's snub of Wilson as "some Yank" from overseas.
These ideological intimations led Edmund Wilson to dismiss her as irrelevant, declaring her "the last surviving person to believe in those quaint old notions on which the republic was founded.
He scintillated; he was good-natured and humorous; he communicated enthusiasm and, as Edmund Wilson said, 'his books were like the floral bombs and the close-packed rockets of fireworks'.
Edmund Wilson, who supervises the South Bureau special unit.
Edmund Wilson in 1962 made use of his debunking of Lincoln to smooth the way for his claim that the confrontation between the Soviet Union and the United States had no moral dimension.
In this respect, Francoise Clary, who writes an interesting essay on "the significance of the water metaphor" in Cane, might have compared her theme to what Edmund Wilson, writing on The Waste Land in The Dial only a month after the poem was publishe d, called "The Poetry of Drouth.
The players in Berman's pageant of despair are many: Royce, Dewey, Russell, Wittgenstein, Santayana, Whitehead, Niebuhr, and Berlin among the philosophers; Van Wyck Brooks, Mencken, Gilbert Seldes, and Edmund Wilson among the literary critics and social commentators.
He did not directly address the subject of his dispute with Edmund Wilson, the topic of an article in this month's Currents in Modern Thought, but many of his interpretations of Ulysses provided clues as to why he was right in his opposition to political art.
That theme is continued in "Part Four: Dreams and Awakenings 1915--1945," a period when--no matter that eastern critics like Edmund Wilson denied it--this state's literature surged, with major writers developing or settling all over the state: Robinson Jeffers, Dashiell Hammett, William Saroyan, John Steinbeck, Raymond Chandler, Nathaniel West.