Wilson

(redirected from Edmund Wilson)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
Clifford, English physician, 1906-1997. See: Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
James, English anatomist, physiologist, and surgeon, 1765-1821. See: Wilson muscle.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
Miriam G., 20th-century U.S. pediatrician. See: Wilson-Mikity syndrome.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
Samuel A. Kinnier, English neurologist, 1878-1937. See: Wilson disease.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
William J.E., English dermatologist, 1809-1884. See: Wilson disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Edmund Wilson, Patriotic Gore: Studies in the Literature of the American Civil War (New York: Oxford University Press, 1962), xvi.
Edmund Wilson is another example of someone who drew strength from inner traditions at odds with his surroundings.
Deborah, 31, of Acomb, near York, died after emergency surgery for head injuries after the fall in the city's Edmund Wilson Pool last April.
Nor does it appear among some of the completed passages Edmund Wilson pieced together for the first print of the novel in 1941, the year after Fitzgerald's death.
Another Edmund Wilson now joined the party--jovial, solicitous, lightly gossipy.
Titian Software s CEO, Edmund Wilson, said : "Sample management in the modern laboratory is driven by increasing efficiency demands.
She is survived by her daughters and their husbands, Pamela and Edmund Wilson of Leesburg, VA, and Nancy and Stephen Neill of Washington, DC; her sister and brothers, Nora Galvin, Patrick Leahy and James Leahy all of County Kerry, Ireland and Sean Leahy of Birmingham, England; four grandchildren, Patrick Wilson, Charlie, Meaghan and Nora Neill; sister-in-law, Beverly Savoie and her husband, Norman of Bouctouche Canada; several nieces and nephews; and countless friends and acquaintances from a long and full life.
In 1965 Nabokov had been embroiled in an acrimonious dispute with his old friend Edmund Wilson about Nabokov's literal translation of Pushkin's Eugene Onegin.
Edmund Wilson was so securely American that he didn't bother with vapid assertions that he lived in a "free country.
Among the luminaries he befriended--and later usually alienated--were giants of twentieth-century American literature, including Edmund Wilson, Saul Bellow, Delmore Schwartz, Ralph Ellison, Irving Howe, and Hannah Arendt.
To the Finland Station by Edmund Wilson (Orion Books, pounds 8.
Reviewing it in 1945, the American literary critic Edmund Wilson thundered, "This is a Catholic tract," yet correctly predicted it would be a bestseller.