endocrine disruptor

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endocrine disruptor

A substance which interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action or elimination of natural hormones in the body that are responsible for development, behaviour, fertility and maintenance of homeostasis (normal cell metabolism).

Examples
DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls, bisphenol A, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, phthalates.

endocrine disruptor

(dĭs-rŭp′tĕr)
A chemical that may imitate or block the function of natural hormones if it is absorbed by the body. Many pesticides and plasticizing compounds, e.g., phthalates, are thought to disrupt endocrine pathways, esp. if they are absorbed by pregnant women during embryonic and fetal development.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The idea of EDC is to restrict data entry: to be invalid (if possible), to avoid trivial data capture, to be readable (since it's recorded on the computer), and to have more complex rules that allow you to compare data across case report forms," said Keet.
EDCs are known to adversely affect human health by disrupting the action of endogenous steroid hormones (Masuo and Ishido 2011; Phillips and Tanphaichitr 2008).
Users may browse by interest, occupation, item type or even similar EDCs through the sophisticated tagging system, making for easy shopping for oneself or others.
The intricate biology of endocrine disruption means that no single assay or approach can be effectively employed to identify compounds that possess EDC characteristics [40].
This could raise the risk of reproductive, metabolic, neurological and other diseases, especially in children who are exposed to EDCs.
In general, the EDCs we surveyed derive their operating budgets mostly from local sources.
EDCs are known by different names in different countries: such as trading houses, export management companies and international trading companies.
In other cities, EDCs have solicited millions of dollars in grants and low-interest loans for business expansion, remodeling and street improvements.
The technical report was launched last year in Canberra at the Second Australian Symposium on Ecological Risk Assessment and Management of EDCs, Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Australasian Environment.
Removal of EDCs and pharmaceuticals in drinking and reuse treatment processes.
According to the report, coauthored by Claudie Fanning and Richard Kadzis, corporate real estate end users view access to markets as the most important factor in considering a location, but EDCs see market access as substantively less important than the corporations.