parasitoid

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Related to Ectoparasitoid: Parasitoidism, Endoparasitoid, Hyperparasitoid

par·a·si·toid

(par'ă-sī'toyd),
Denoting a feeding relationship intermediate between predation and parasitism, in which the parasitoid eventually destroys its host; refers especially to parasitic wasps (order Hymenoptera) the larvae of which feed on and finally destroy a grub or other arthropod host stung by the mother wasp before laying its egg(s) on the host.
[parasite + G. eidos, appearance]

parasitoid

(păr′ə-sĭ-toid′, -sī′toid)
n.
An organism, usually an insect, that lives on or in a host organism during some period of its development and eventually kills its host.

par′a·sit·oid′ adj.

parasitoid

any of the alternately parasitic and free-living wasps and flies, such as the ichneumon fly, whose larvae parasitize and often kill members of the host species.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pteromalidae) a larval pupal ectoparasitoid of the pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (L.
Growth of a pupal ectoparasitoid, Diapetimorpha introita, on an artificial diet: stimulation of growth rate by a lipid extract from host pupae.
Relationship between temperature and development of the ectoparasitoid Larra bicolor (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) and the endoparasitoid Ormia depleta (Diptera: Tachinidae).
Relationships between the emergence and oviposition of ectoparasitoid Spathius agrili Yang and its host emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire.
At first, the contents of cocoons preserved in alcohol were superficially examined while backlit to check for the presence of any ectoparasitoid.
Endoparasitoids (endo) develop inside of the prey while ectoparasitoids (ecto) develop outside of the host body.
Coccophagus females are diploid, developing from fertilized eggs, but are also produced from unfertilized eggs, whereas the males are invariably haploid, produced from unfertilized eggs; males are either primary ectoparasitoids, secondary ectoparasitoids or endoparasitoids of other primary hymenopterous parasitoids, including females of the same species (Hayat 1997).
Most Bombyliidae are ectoparasitoids, with first instar triungulin larvae that actively search and attach to the body of the hosts.