immigration

(redirected from Economic migration)
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immigration

the movement of organisms into a specific area. Compare EMIGRATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The focus of this article regards the re-situating of the issue of Eastern European economic migration into the larger context of European economic and political asymmetries, overdetermined by social contradictions and economic dependence, can help surmount the ideological and reactionary-idealist populist discourse upon the issue of economic migration.
In its pages, readers will learn about the rebirth of a country and millions of lives changed, hear what migration can tell us about the future of China, and discover what China's development can teach the rest of the world about the role of market liberalization and economic migration in fighting poverty and creating prosperity.
In Pakistan effect of economic migration on left behind family has mainly studied in economic perspectives, and little attention has been paid to investigate the psychological sufferings of left behind family members.
But economic migration is a different matter altogether.
The history of the community stretches back almost 70 years when labour shortages within key public services and industries prompted economic migration that is often but not only linked with the SS Empire Windrush in 1948.
However, economic migration is where this book truly shines, making relevant connections to Germany today.
It is important not to confuse economic migration with the refugee crisis that stems from conflict on Europe's doorstep.
The government has no intention of ending economic migration, much of which came from outside the EU last year anyway, nor would it be economically possible, physically practical or morally acceptable to expel millions of people already resident and employed here.
Of course, unlike the value of new friendships, the importance of economic migration is not a personal judgment.
Ed Balls told the Mirror: "We need to press Europe to restore proper borders and put new controls on economic migration.
Curbs to the free movement of labour from the EU, as well as an overall weakening of the economy, would reduce the incentives for economic migration to the UK - which has accounted for half of GDP growth since 2005 - and would be a further "cost".