refugee

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refugee

A person who:
(1) has a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership of a particular social group;
(2) is outside the country he or she belongs to or normally resides in; and
(3) is unable or unwilling to return home for fear of persecution.

Refugees may include those fleeing from war or civil disturbance of any kind; a permutation is that of an ‘internally displaced’ person who moves within the borders of one country for the same reasons. The mortality rate of refugees is 60-fold greater than that of a similar non-displaced population; it is highest in children and is due to measles, diarrhoea-related illnesses, acute upper RTIs, malaria and is in part related to the virtually endemic protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies that characterise the refugee state; diarrhoea is the most common cause of death (36,000 children die/day of diarrhoea).

Refugees have been called the fourth world, and have included Afghans, Armenians, Bengalis, Biafrans, Bosnians, Cambodians, Chileans, Croats, Cubans, Czechoslovakians, Ethiopians, Hungarians, Iraqis, Laotians, Liberians, Palestinians, Russians, Rwandans, Serbs, Somalis, Vietnamese, and cross religious lines—Jews, Hindis, and Muslims Records.

In the UK, refugees are entitled to benefits.

refugee

A person fleeing danger or distress, esp. in times of war or political persecution.
References in periodicals archive ?
Economic migrants traveling to different shores for greater income could be set for disappointment - because the pursuit of wealth does not equate with happiness, suggests the research.
Over 40% of economic migrants reside in London, contributing GBP13.
Although the Chinese nationals were economic migrants, their discovery August 16 in downtown McAllen left many with an uneasy feeling," observed syndicated columnist James Pinkerton.
Ever the activist, as well as the contemplative, Sister Start is already at grips with a new challenge--one that she admits she's hardly begun--to work with the economic migrants and asylum seekers who have recently started to come into Ireland.
The problem with unwanted economic migrants isn't confined to Europe.
There were fewer members of the Macedonian army but now there is a fence that makes it more difficult for the economic migrants to throw stones at Macedonia's army and police.
The talks on Wednesday come as Greek authorities are struggling with the influx of refugees and economic migrants reaching Greek islands from Turkey.
Europe cannot accept all of those people, he said, remarking also that distinctions must be made between real asylum seekers and economic migrants.
Calling for new measures to deter "illegal economic migrants" from trying to enter the EU, she said: "We need to ensure people arriving at Europe's borders are being properly dealt with, properly fingerprinted, so that decisions can be made and where they are illegal economic migrants they can be returned.
We tend to call these unfortunates "migrants" but that term covers at least three types of travellers; refugees seeking asylum, economic migrants, and criminals and agitators ready to cause trouble.
The problem is not thousands, but hundreds of thousands or even millions who want to come here, many economic migrants, who then want to bring their families.
Economic migrants, or those with family members in the UK, were offered four-year "work visas" to enable them to work without calling on public funds.