echolocation

(redirected from Echolocating)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Echolocating: Biosonar, Animal echolocation

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

(ek'ō-lō-kā'shŭn),
Term applied to the method by which bats direct their flight and avoid solid objects. The creatures emit high-pitched cries that, though inaudible to human ears, are heard by the bats themselves as reflected sounds (echoes) from objects in their path.

echolocation

the means by which objects are identified through echoes returned from very high frequency sound emissions. Bats use such a system to avoid objects in flight and to locate prey, as do toothed whales and dolphins.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Determining the mere presence of bats echolocating is the most basic way to use a bat detector and can be done nearly everywhere in the U.
Nevertheless, the results convincingly demonstrate sufficiency--some sighted participants can achieve echolocating precision approaching that of an experienced echolocator who is blind.
The sound emission pattern of the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus.
Echolocating, they send bursts of clicks outward; lower frequencies to rough objects out, higher frequencies to fill in the details.
It is amazingly sophisticated and precise: An echolocating bat can detect objects as small as a human hair; it can use riverbanks, vegetation and other terrain features as acoustic landmarks; and it can determine not only a target's speed and direction, but also its size and surface texture.
Barclay RMR and Brigham RE: Constraints on optimal foraging: a field test of prey discrimination by echolocating insectivorous bats.
The high-pitched sounds they emit when echolocating are above the range of our human hearing.
Why do we find beating hearts, or echolocating devices, or tit-for-tat patterns of behaviour, in this or that species or population?
At one point I am swimming with a mother and calf; the mother makes eye contact with me, and suddenly I feel it: the zap of the dolphin echolocating me, almost like an electric shock.
An increasingly rapid series of echolocating calls fired off by a bat as it closes in on an airborne insect.