echogenicity


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echogenicity

/echo·ge·nic·i·ty/ (-jĕ-nis´ĭ-te) in ultrasonography, the extent to which a structure gives rise to reflections of ultrasonic waves.

echogenic

(ek″ŏ-jen′ik) [ echo + -genic]
Capable of producing echoes, i.e., of intensely reflecting sound waves rather than transmitting them.
echogenicity (-jĕ-nis′ĭt-ē)

echogenicity

the characteristic ability of a tissue or substance to reflect sound waves and produce echoes. Bone and gas are most echogenic and fluids such as urine and bile the least. Organ parenchyma and soft tissues are intermediate, but each differs slightly from the other and relative characteristics are known.
References in periodicals archive ?
The correlation between the echogenicity of the SN and clinical symptoms in Chinese patients with PDD was also assessed.
The proventricular cross-section usually images as a round structure of medium echogenicity with hyperechoic contents (ingesta, at times with food particles that produce posterior acoustic shadows).
The internal structure is described by echogenicity, whereas vascularization is mostly described as hilar, peripheral, or avascular (6-8).
Ultrasound criteria include a diameter greater than 6 mm, concentric rings (target sign), an appendicolith, high echogenicity, obstruction of the lumen, and fluid surrounding the appendix.
On US, hepatic involvement of amyloidosis has nonspecific findings such as, heterogeneous echogenicity, diffuse or focal areas of decreased parenchymal attenuation (Fig.
Characteristic ultrasound features of a benign nodule include an oval or flat shape, echogenicity similar to normal gland parenchyma, a smooth margin, hypoechoic halo around the nodule and peripheral vascularity on color doppler examination1-5.
The other four categories have four choices each, such as "hypoechoic" under the category echogenicity or "lobulated or irregular" under margin.
Meanwhile, the child underwent a transfontanellar US scan that showed increased echogenicity of the subcortical white matter and extensive cystic periventricular leukomalacia, well-known findings interpreted as sequelae of HIE.
Due to the suspicious ultrasonographic findings such as echogenicity at the bladder wall, an abdominal CT was performed.
Transvaginal ultrasound examination revealed uterine enlargement and the endometrial cavity was partially filled with cystic areas of increased echogenicity and typically showed snowstorm appearance.
Liver parenchymal echogenicity and biliary ducts on the right lobe were apparently normal.
Parenchymal echogenicity was increased, echo-pattern was homogenous, no duct dilatation was seen, and the contour was smooth.