echolocation

(redirected from Echo-location)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ech·o·lo·ca·tion

(ek'ō-lō-kā'shŭn),
Term applied to the method by which bats direct their flight and avoid solid objects. The creatures emit high-pitched cries that, though inaudible to human ears, are heard by the bats themselves as reflected sounds (echoes) from objects in their path.

echolocation

the means by which objects are identified through echoes returned from very high frequency sound emissions. Bats use such a system to avoid objects in flight and to locate prey, as do toothed whales and dolphins.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Volunteers, many of them members of the nonprofit Friends of Great Swamp, conduct echo-location surveys, using a device to detect and record the number of bats calls emitted in 15-minute intervals.
Expert ecologist, Ian Bond, will lead the way on a twilight trek to find the elusive creature using a special bat detector which homes in on a bat's high frequency echo-location system.
Theories include disturbance of echo-location, possibly by interference from sound produced by human activities at sea.