Echinococcus granulosus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Echinococcus

 [e-ki″no-kok´us]
a genus of small tapeworms.
Echinococcus granulo´sus a species parasitic in dogs and wolves and occasionally in cats; its larvae may develop in nearly all mammals, forming hydatid cysts in the liver, lungs, kidneys, and other organs. It reverses the usual process of development in human and animal hosts: the adult is found in the intestine of dogs, whereas the larva develops in the human intestine, penetrates the intestinal wall, and settles in various organs, most often the liver, where it forms a cyst (hydatid cyst) that grows slowly. Treatment is by surgical removal of the cyst. This type of worm infection is fortunately not common in the United States.
Echinococcus multilocula´ris a species whose adult forms usually parasitize the fox and wild rodents, although humans are sporadically infected. It resembles E. granulosus, but the larvae form alveolar or multilocular rather than unilocular cysts.

E·chi·no·coc·cus gran·u·lo·'sus

hydatid tapeworm, a species in which adults infect canids and the larval form (osseous and unilocular hydatid cysts) infects sheep and other ruminants, pigs, and horses; may also occur in humans, giving rise to a large cyst in the liver or other organs and tissues.
Enlarge picture
ECHINOCOCCUS GRANULOSUS CYSTS

Echinococcus granulosus

A species that infests dogs and other carnivores. Its hydatid (larva) develops in other mammals, including humans, and causes the formation of hydatid cysts in the liver or lungs. Synonym: dog tapeworm
See: illustration; hydatid
See also: Echinococcus

Echinococcus

a genus of small tapeworms of the family Taeniidae.

Echinococcus granulosus
a species parasitic in dogs and wolves and occasionally in cats; its larvae may develop in ungulates and macropods, forming hydatid cysts in the liver, lungs, kidneys and/or other organs.
Echinococcus multilocularis
a species whose adult stage usually parasitizes the fox, dog and cat. It resembles E. granulosus, but the larvae form alveolar or multilocular rather than unilocular cysts and occur principally in rodents but can infect humans.
Echinococcus oligarthus
occurs in wild cats with larval stages in rodents.
Echinococcus vogeli
occurs in domestic and wild dogs with intermediate stages in rodents and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the first report of Echinococcus granulosus in Maine, and is unusual since this parasite was not thought as endemic to the northeastern United States due to the current absence of wolves (http://www.
Insanlik tarihi kadar eski bir hastahk oldugu dusunulen hidatik kist genellikle Echinococcus granulosus ve nadiren diger Echinococcus larvalanmn neden oldugu parazitik bir hastalik olup ozellikle gelismekte olan ulkelerde onemli bir halk sagligi sorunudur.
Random amplified polymorphic DNA for the specific detection of bubaline Echinococcus granulosus by hybridization assay.
The primary hydatid disease of the bone, caused by Echinococcus granulosus is formed when the scoleces are localized in the bone, and it is seen in 1% to 2.
Two forms of Taneia Echinococcus are known to affect humans, Echinococcus Granulosus and Echinococcus Multilocularis (Alveolaris).
Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic disease caused by the taeniid tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (1).
Cystic echinococcosis (CE) of Echinococcus granulosus develops in internal organs (mainly liver and lungs) of humans and other intermediate hosts with unilocular fluid-filled bladders.
A37-year-old woman of Middle Eastern descent had a hepatic infection with Echinococcus granulosus diagnosed in her home country based on clinical and sonographic findings.
Cystic hydatid disease is caused by the tapeworm (cestode) Echinococcus granulosus, which is predominantly seen in areas where sheep and cattle are raised (1).
The egg of Echinococcus granulosus only in fecal samples of stray dogs was isolated.
Echinococcosis is caused by the larva of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multiloccularis and is endemic in many rural areas of southern Africa.
In this way, the sheep model with Echinococcus granulosus infection was established, whereas, in our research, adult cestodes with fertilized egg proglottis were fed orally to sheep, and the objective was to imitate natural infection with hydatids.