Ebstein's anomaly


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Ebstein's anomaly

 [eb´shtīnz]
a malformation of the tricuspid valve, the septal and posterior leaflets being adherent to the wall of the right ventricle to a varying degree, producing tricuspid deficiency, and the anterior leaflet being normally attached to the annulus fibrosus; usually associated with an atrial septal defect.
Ebstein's anomaly with tricuspid valve significantly displaced downward in the right ventricle; leakage occurs through the tricuspid valve back to the right atrium, and unoxygenated blood is shunted across the atrial-septal defect into the left atrium. From Betz et al., 1994.

Ebstein's anomaly

Etymology: Wilhelm Ebstein, German physician, 1836-1912; Gk, anomalia, irregularity
a congenital heart defect in which the tricuspid valve is displaced downward into the right ventricle. The abnormality is often associated with right-to-left atrial shunting and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

Ebstein's anomaly

An uncommon (0.5% of all congenital heart defects) cardiac malformation, which is characterised by apical displacement of the septal and posterior tricuspid valve leaflets, with atrialisation of the right ventricle and displacement of the anterior leaflet, leading to tricuspid regurgitation of varying severity and backflow of blood into the right atrium from the right ventricle.

Ebstein's anomaly

a malformation of the tricuspid valve, usually associated with an atrial septal defect, characterized by a downward displacement of the base of the valves.
References in periodicals archive ?
05% risk for a heart malformation because they feel that oral clefts can be repaired more easily, while the morbidity and mortality of Ebstein's anomaly is high, even though the risk is exceedingly small.
Pathologic anatomy of the Ebstein's anomaly of the heart revisited.
Ren and co-authors cover the basic concepts of ICE, the imaging equipment, catheterization techniques, imaging techniques in terms of cardiac structure, common abnormalities diagnosed in electrophysiological procedures, left heart transducer position, utility for experimental electrophysiological procedures in swine, and ICE imaging in radiofrequency catheter ablation in cases of sinus, atrial and ventricular tachycardia and in cases of atrial fibrillation and Ebstein's Anomaly.
The 12-hour operation aimed to overcome her condition, Ebstein's Anomaly, in which a leaky valve and a hole-in-the-heart combine to give poor circulation.