Ebola

(redirected from Ebolavirus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Ebola

(ĭ-bō′lə, ĕb′ō-lä)
n.
1. A filovirus that causes disease in humans and nonhuman primates and spreads through contact with bodily fluids of infected people and animals. Bats are thought to be the host reservoir for the virus. Also called Ebola virus.
2. An acute, usually fatal form of hemorrhagic fever that is caused by this virus and is characterized by fever, headache, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding, especially from the mucous membranes and gastrointestinal tract. Also called Ebola disease, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola virus disease.

Ebola,

river in Zaire, Africa.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever - Synonym(s): Ebola virus
Ebola virus - filovirus discovered in 1976, level 4 pathogen; severity of illness can run from mild to fatal in host. Synonym(s): Ebola hemorrhagic fever
References in periodicals archive ?
Assessment should consider any potential spread of Ebolavirus into domesticated farm animals, particularly in light of changing land use patterns.
We are now also providing the RealStar Ebolavirus kit for altona Diagnostics to help stop this deadly epidemic.
Members of the family Filoviridae are classified into 3 genera: Marburgvirus, Ebolavirus, and the recently approved Cuevavirus (2,3).
Zaire ebolavirus has periodically plagued Central Africa since the 1970s, but this is its first appearance in West Africa.
These viruses differ in geographical spread, and the Zaire Ebolavirus has been associated with the most fatal outbreaks to date.
Characterization of Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein-specific monoclonal antibodies.
The 2007 outbreak of EHF in Bundibugyo District, Uganda, was caused by a new EBOV species, Bundibugyo ebolavirus (13).
The researchers placed two rhesus macaques infected with Zaire ebolavirus in cages near two uninfected cynomolgus macaques.
The virus is a variety of Zaire ebolavirus but carries 341 genetic changes not seen in previous outbreaks.
The Zaire ebolavirus is the strain responsible for the current epidemic in West Africa.
Association between temperature, humidity and ebolavirus disease outbreaks in Africa, 1976 to 2014.
Profile and persistence of the virus-specific neutralizing humoral immune response in human survivors of Sudan ebolavirus (Gulu).